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To the Right Honorable oure singular good Lorde The Earle of Shrewsberye 15 Knight of the most noble [Order] of the Garter etc.'

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nostros relinquere perget. E Collegio Diui Joannis Cantabrigiae 15° die Aprilis 1600.

Honori tuo addictissimi

Ric. Claitonus.
Henricus Alvey.
Daniel Monsey.

Arthurus Johnson.

Joannes Allenson.

Thomas Bends.

Wms Billingsley.
Guilielmus Pratt.

This letter is rotten and torn. It was probably restored to the college by Booth.

P. 1931. 1. lady Arabella. See MS. Baker vI. 338, 339, 348—350=B 298— 304

P. 193 1. 3. lady Shrewsbury imprisoned. Jo. More writes to Ra. Winwood, Lond. 18 June 1611 (Winwood's Memorials III. 281): 'On Saturday last the Countesse of Shrewsbury was lodged in the Tower, where she is like long to rest, as well as the Lady Arabella. The last named Lady answered the Lords at her Examination with good Judgment and Discretion: But the other is said to be utterly without Reason, crying out that all is but tricks and giggs; that she will answere nothing in private, and yf she have offended the Lawe, she will answere it in publicke. She is said to have amassed a great somme of Money to some ill use, £20,000 are known to be in her Cash: and that she had made provision for more Bills of Exchange to her Neice's use, then she had knowledge of. And thoughe the Lady Arabella hath not as yet been fownd inclinable to Popery, yet her Aunt made account belike that being beyond the Seas in the Hands of Jesuites and Priests, either the Stroke of their Arguments or the Pinch of Poverty might force her to the other Syde'. Cf. ibid. 429.

The fullest account may be seen in the Calendar of State Papers, 1611-1618, index s. v. Talbot, Mary. On 9 Oct. 1611 the earl of Shrewsbury writes to ld. Salisbury, requesting 'shutters for the windows, boards before the doors, and repair of a hole in the roof of the rooms where his wife is lodged' (p. 80). On 27 Mar. 1616 Chamberlain speaks of her as liberated by Ra. Winwood's means (p. 358). Her troubles did not cease: on 9 May 1617 Geo. Gerrard writes: "The widowed countess of Shrewsbury is almost out of her mind, with a dread of being poisoned; her two court sons, the lord chamberlain and the earl of Arundel, beg the protection of her estate, and will enjoy the fruits of it, if she do not mind.' Cf. p. 548. One is glad to find that she had the best rooms in the Tower, 12 Sept. 1618 (p. 569). See

Kennett's Memoirs of the Family of Cavendish 4 seq.; Thoroton's Notts 455; Lilly's Life 27. Howell's Sta. Trials. II. 770--775; Nichols' Progresses of James, II. 642. Wotton's Remains 412 (the 2nd). Tho. Lorkin to Sir Tho. Puckering, Greenwich 30 June 1618 (Birch's Court and Times of James I. II. 77): Lady Shrewsbury 'was com- 5 mitted to the Tower some months since, for refusing to answer to some interrogatories propounded unto her, upon a fame that was divulged abroad, how the Lady Arabella should have left a son to inherit her right; which resolution she peremptorily continued in the open face of the court, under pretence forsooth of a vow formerly made, 10 of not answering to any article touching the said Lady Arabella, and was for that her obstinacy censured with a fine of £20,000 and perpetual imprisonment, unless, upon her voluntary submission in that particular, his majesty should graciously please to grant her enlargement.' Jo. Chamberlain to Sir Dudley Carleton, Lond. 13 Aug. 1618 15 (ibid. 87): This week the Lord Coke, the attorney-general, and solicitor, by order from the king, went to the lady of Shrewsbury to offer her the oath of allegiance, which she, absolutely refusing it, run they say into a præmunire, and so in danger, if the king deal rigorously with her, to lose all she hath.' Cf. ibid. 80 n.

David Morton.

P. 193 n. 1.
P. 193 n. 3.
P. 193 1. 32.
P. 194 1. 3.
P. 194 1. 6.

College orders Feb. 23, 1608. See p. 551 1. 24.
the plague, 1605. Cooper's Ann. III. 19.

Morton kept his act.

See his Life, 1659, p. 24 seq.

Dr Playfere. Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 513.

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P. 194 1. 15.
Cooper's

An order for the observance of 5 Nov. MS. Baker XLII. 27;
Ann. III. 23.

P. 194 1. 18.

University burgesses, ibid. 3, 4.

P. 194 1. 20.

charter, ibid. 14—17; cf. MS. Baker XXIX. 383, 384.

P. 194 1. 23.

the livings of popish recusants. Stat. 3 Jac. I. c. 5, s. 13; 30 Cooper ibid. 21, 22.

P. 194 1. 25. Gift of Somersham and Terrington, ibid. 18; Patrick Papers (Univ. Libr.) 23 (5) ff. 6 vo. 7.

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P. 194 1. 31. order against tobacco. Cooper ibid. 27, 28; Heywood and Wright II. 224-226; MS. Baker XLII. 28. During the king's visit 35 Mar. 161 expulsion was the penalty for resorting to a tobacco shop, or taking tobacco in St Mary's church or Trin. coll. hall (Cooper, 68).

P. 194 1. 33. that evil custom. Archly said; Baker's one indulgence was a new pipe laid out for him daily.

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P. 195 n. 3.

See p. 551 1. 10.

P. 195 n. 4.

See p. 551 1. 5.

P. 195 1. 23.

See p. 199 n. 1; App. B. to 5th Educ. Rep. (1818) p. 405.

P. 195 l. 27, 28. complaints at court; a visitation. See pp. 498, 499.

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P. 195 n. 5.

D. M. David Morton.

P. 196 1. 1.

his next relations not agreeing about the division. One thing at least was carried away, which belonged to the college (Commun. to Cambr. Ant. Soc. II. 144). Rob. Booth to Dr Gwyn 18 July, 1612: 'I am informed by some of your Colledg, (vppon my enquyrye aftTM a picture of my La: the Cowntesse of Shrewsbury, we her ho. at my humble sute bestowed vppon the Colledg, and desyred yt Dr Clayton would cause it to be hanged vpp in the gallerye there) yt Mrs Ashton hath taken it away, as parte of the goodes of her brothr deceased: These are therfore earnestlye to desyre you to vse all good meanes for the recoverye thereof for the Colledg behoof, & yf it shalbe needful, I will at all tymes be readye to testifye vppon my othe, yt it was bestowed vppō the Colledg, & yt Dr Clayton only made sute for it, for yt purpose. I am boulde to signifye thus much vnto yo" out of love and dutye to the Colledg. And so wt hartiest comendacōs I take leve. in Brode-Street in London in hast.'

P. 196 1. 13. Williams' life of Vaughan. See p. 255 l. 18; Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 451.

25 P. 196 1. 21. Baro. Overal, Clayton, Harsnet and Andrewes approved his doctrine of universal grace and of God's good-will to all mankind. Strype's Whitgift, bk. IV. c. 18 p. 473.

P. 196 1. 21. Barret. Strype's Whitgift bk. IV. c. 14, p. 436, c. 16, p. 458. One of the false doctrines' which he taught against Calvin, Peter Martyr, Beza, Zanchius, was 'Quod ad eos attinet, qui non servantur, peccatum esse veram, propriam causam reprobationis.' Against this Hen. Alvey and 17 others of St John's protested (ib. c. 14, PP. 436, 437).

P. 198 L 3. Ri. Senhouse. In June 1621 there was a report that Gwyn was preferred to St David's and Senhouse would succeed him. Birch's Court and Times of James I. II. 263.

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Val. Carey twice fellow, pp. 291 1. 17, 292 1. 6.

P. 198 l. 11. P. 198 1. 16. Owen Gwyn. See some account of him in Commun. to Cambr. Ant. Soc. II. 26; also his letter 17 June 1616, respecting the prosecution of Allesson a puritan, in Heywood and Wright Cambr. Univ. Trans. II. 263, 264. A lively picture of college life under this master is contained in a diary of Sir Symonds D'Ewes, preserved at Colchester. Canon Marsden published some extracts from it in Blackwood, and afterwards separately Lond. 1841. 12mo. I have a complete transcript and hope at leisure to edit the whole.-In Gwyn's time the following patents were granted (Commission Documents 1. 79): 15 Jac. p. 18 n. 12: Court leet in Ickelford manor Herts.-18 Jac. p. 6 n. 16 and 20 Jac. p. 8 n. 14: Licences in mortmain. In Dec. 1624 the French ambassador was entertained at St John's (Heywood and Wright ibid. 617).

45 P. 198 1. 18. his pupil's intrigues. Jo. Williams to Sir Jo. Wynne, Proctors' booth in Sturbridge 13 Sept. 1612 (Letters of abp. Williams, Cambr. 1866, pp. 15, 16): 'Afterwards falls in the interim our Heade-shippe of

St. John's, in which busines I, servinge my turne abroade, with the good opinion conceiv'de of me at home, was thoughte to have donne such service, as procur'de the hatred of two of the chiefe masters, Dr. Carye beinge one of them; who, as they thinke, hadd it not been for me, hadd gott the maistershippe of St. John's.'

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P. 199 1. 21. a better lease. See pp. 195 l. 23, 551 1. 7; App. B. to 5th Educ. Rep. (1818) pp. 405, 406.

P. 199 1. 29. Downehale petitions the chancellor. See p. 498 l. 42, and for what follows p. 499.

to have recourse to the bp. of Ely. See p. 176 1. 30.

P. 200 1. 5.
P. 2001. 10. refused to send the bp. a copy of the statutes.
1. I-22.

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See p. 491

P. 2011. 6. dividend of the fines amongst the fellows. See college orders 27 Apr. 1626 (App. B., as above, pp. 406, 407), n. 3: That the same fine money may be disposed to the best advantage of the whole 15 society.' n. 6: That the master and fellows in their seniority may have the offer of the seals, upon expiration or other avoidances of them, before strangers, upon proportionable fines.' Two excellent decrees were made at the same time. '9. That there be presently a Copy writt out of all their Decrees, which may be kept in the Library with 20 the Statutes, that all the fellows may know them, and so enable themselves to observe them. 10. That all the former decrees may be by the master and seniors examined, whether they be agreeable to the Statutes or not; and such as are found contrary to them, to be utterly reversed and cancelled.' Gwyn was also the author of the admirable 25 system of registration on admission, which was continued for about 150 years, and which every college would do well to adopt; Caius and King's have still, I believe, as exact a register.—(ibid. 406): 21 Jan. 163: That the register of the College should have a booke provided him, wherein he should from time to time write and register the names, 30 parents, country, school, age, and tutor of every one to be admitted into the College before their enrolling into the buttry tables; and shall receive of each of them for his pains, as the head lecturers and deans do, for their admission.'

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P. 2011. 14. visit of the prince of Wales. Cooper's Ann. III. 56, 57;35 MS. Cambr. Univ. Libr. Ee. v. 16 art. 1.

P. 201 n. 3. The sum is incorrectly given £130. 6s. 2d. in Nichols' Progr. and thence in Cooper l. c., from Cole's copy; the original has £131. 68. 2d.

P. 201 1. 37 and 38. King's visits Mar. 161 and May 1615. See MS. 40 Baker XXXI. 243, 244; Cooper, 65-89; Nichols III. 46-77, 82-91. Baker (MS. xx. 254 in Nichols) has a notice of an earlier visit from the college accounts 1613: 'For wood at the king's coming £4.' Jo. Chamberlain writes to Sir Dudley Carleton 16 Mar. 161 (Nichols 49 seq.): "The Lord Treasurer [earl of Suffolk] kept there a great port 45 and magnificent table, with the expense of £1000 a day, as it is said,

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but that seems too large an allowance; but sure his provisions were very great, besides plenty of presents, and may be in some sort estimated by his proportion of wine, whereof he spent 26 tun in 5 days. He lodged and kept his table at St John's College...The King and Prince lay at Trinity College, where the Plays were represented; and the Hall so well ordered for room, that above 2000 persons were conveniently placed. The first night's entertainment was a Comedy [Aemilia, in Latin, by Tho. Cecill], made and acted by St John's men, the chief part consisting of a counterfeit Sir Edward Radcliffe, a foolish Doctor of Physic, which proved but a lean argument; and though it were larded with pretty shews at the beginning and end, and with somewhat too broad speech for such a presence, yet it was still dry.' The second night, 8 Mar., the famous play of Ignoramus, by Geo. Ruggle, who was originally of St John's, was acted. Phin. Fletcher's Sicelides was written for the same occasion. On the king's second visit, 13 May (ibid. 86 seq.), 'being within Trinity College, against the first rails, Dr. Gwynne, Deputy Vice-chancellor, made an Oration to him, giving him thanks for his love to them, that he was pleased again so suddenly to come to them again, and highly extolling his Majesty and his virtues.' Gwyn seems to have taken much pains in arranging the spectators at the play: see the prologue to Ignoramus (ibid. 89):

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'Locum Episcopi Cicestriensis,
Procancellarii Cantabrigiensis,
Malo fato tunc absentis,
Alter forte tum supplebat,
Qui vices eius bene gerebat;
Fecit namque congregari,
Et in uno loco stare,
Scholasticorum totum gregem,
Ad videndum nostrum Regem.
Stabant primo loco gentes,
Quas vulg. pop. vocat Recentes;

Illos subsequuntur isti
Qui vocantur hic Sophistae;
Et post illos alter status,
Ordo Baccalaureatus;
Proximas tenebant partes
Hi qui sciunt omnes Artes;
Ubi illi desinebant,
Non-regentes apparebant,
Pone (gentium di maiorum!)
Turba gravis stat Doctorum.'

P. 202 1. I and n. I. The king entertained by the college. MS. Baker XII. 153 (in Nichols 64):

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'Paid Mr Vice-chancellor for entertainment of his Majestie at his first coming

Paid for his Entertainment at his second coming

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40 Paid of the fine-money for charges at his Majestie's coming,

per billam

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"The King being gone from Trinity,
They make a scramble for degree;
Masters of all sorts and all ages,
Keepers, subsizers, lackeys, pages,

£. s. d.

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19 16 0

499 7 2'

P. 202 1. 3. degrees vilely prostituted to mean persons. Camden's Ann. 7 Mar. 161; Wood's Ann., ed. Gutch, II. 320; Bp. Ri. Corbet (Nichols 72):

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