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in MS. Baker XII. 107; from MS. Kk. i. 3 art. 9, Univ. Libr. Camb. See Ath. Cant. I. 491, 569; Goldasti Monarch. III. 66; the dedication of Seton's Logic. Mr Baker, at p. [138] seems to say, that the arms belonging to this worthy and unfortunate bishop were the same as those borne by the Rockingham family: I suppose therefore, that those arms are assigned him on the table of arms in the college: yet as I know these table arms in all the colleges are chiefly fictitious, and made by Scot at random, from sameness of name, sound or allusion to the college arms, or other incidents, I have rather chosen to give those assigned him by Mr. Willis, who no doubt had his authority, though he knew nothing of heraldry: for this reason, because these complicated arms are according to the style of the times he lived in. Perhaps the doves are mistaken by Mr. Willis for martlets; but I give them as I find them.' WM. COLE. cf. MS. Cole LVII. 369.

15 P. 244 1. 27. JO. CRISTOFORSON. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. 1. 188, 551.

P. 245 1. 22. THO. BOUCHER. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. I. 449, 568. 'There seems to be strange confusion about this person. Mr. Baker's reason, perhaps, for making him rather prior than abbat of Leicester, was because he found that Tho. Bouchier was neither abbat of Leicester nor Bp. of Gloucester, but John Bouchier had been both. John Bouchier of Leicester quondam abbas was nominated by Hen. 8. to be bishop of Shrewsbury, v. Strype's Memorials, Vol. I. p. 276. of the appendix. and John Bower (for Bowcher), late abbat of Leicester, was returned to be a fugitive beyond the seas in 1575. Peck's Des. Cur. Vol. I. lib. 2. p. 26. I suppose his name after all was John, and that he might have studied in St. John's college Cambridge, as in the Life of Bp. Fisher, from whence Mr. Baker probably took it, and afterwards in Magdalen college in Oxford, as Bp. Tanner has it: for I suppose them the same person, tho' Bp. Tanner calls him Thomas, and says, that he was of a noble English family, for which reason I have given the Essex arms; that he quitted England for religion, settled some time at Paris, where he took the Franciscan habit, and was doctor of the Sorbon; then entered into the convent of Ara Cali at Rome, and was penitentiary in St. John Lateran, and died about 1584 or 1585.' WM. COLE. 1777. See my vol. 21. p. 229, 230, for more on the subject.' WM. COLE. 1780.

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P. 245 l. 32. EDWIN SANDYS. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 24, 543. He was a friend of Rod. Gualter's (Buchanani Opera II. 757, 758). He is said to have added a chapel to Highgate school (Strype's Stow, App. 1. 135 a), but this Mr Cooper questions. On the puritans' hatred of him see Parte of a Register 101-105, 371-381; examines Rob. Johnson ib. 105 seq. (20 Febr. 157); letter to him from Johnson (ibid. 117, 118); letter from Gualter (1574), Bancroft Pret. Holy Disc. 455; cf. 452, 453; his dispute with Travers etc. Marprelate, Epist. 57.

'It seems a piece of affectation, somewhat worse, if what Mr Willis says of his alienations of the Churche's estates to his family and others, and of his quarelsome, unquiet Temper [be true], that he should be commended for the opposite virtues. See some MS. letters between

Mr Willis and Dr Thomas on this subject in my volumes. v. Mr Baker's
letters, No. 132, p. 229, for his being said to have been buried at
Hawkeshead. And No. 133, p. 230.'

WM. COLE.

P. 246 L. I.

Read vicinia.

P. 246 1. 27.

Read hospitalissimus.

P. 246 1. 32.

a filio. Sir Edwin Sandys.

P. 246 1. 36.

ROB. HORNE. See Ath. Cant. I. 407, 567; his benefaction to the public library (Heywood and Wright Camb. Univ. Trans. II. 434).

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P. 247 1. 25. Dedit Biblia Hebraea ac Rab. Salomonis commentarios collegio,
MSS. A 1 and 3.

'The arms of Bp. Gardiner and Horne have long been confounded: I think there can be no doubt of those in the Antiquitates Britannicæ being authentic: the same are in a window of my honoured friend, Mr 15 Horace Walpole his elegant house at Strawberry Hill in Twickenham parish in Middlesex, as I have given them here, ensigned with a mitre, and surrounded with the garter v. my vol. 40 p. 41. Wм. COLE. Aug. 14, natalis meus. 1714.

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P. 248 l. 4.

JAS. PILKINGTON. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. I. 344, 563. The 20 letter written as it is thought' by him cir. 1570 (Parte of a register iii. 19—22) is cited by Prynne Canterb. Doome 117, 118 (wrongly numbered 115, 116). Letters to Sir Wm. Cecil in Gent. Mag. Nov. 1860, p. 484 seq. His epitaph is in MS. Hunter n. 22 art. 34 in Durham library; epicedium on by Jo. Fox ibid. art. 27; particulars of 25 ibid. n. 132 art. 9. His benefaction to the public library (Heywood and Wright Camb. Univ. Trans. II. 434).

'The Arms of Pilkington of Rivington, as in an authentic MS. of Heraldry, are Argent, a Cross Patonce voided, Gules: but as those I have put down for the Bp. are in the Antiquitates Britannicæ, 30 published when he was alive, I have preferred them: and have given them to his brother; as supposing they both used the same Coat.'

WM. COLE. P. 249 1. 5. THOMAS DAVYES. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. 1. 319. A note of his will in MS. Baker xxv. 405. 35

P. 249 1. 13. RI. CURTES. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. 1. 455, 568; Brydges'
Archaica, II. 189.

P. 250 l. 17. Jo. YOUNG. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. I. 405. Marprelate's Epist. 5, 14. Peshall's Oxford, 70. On the Jo. Yonge fell. St John's 1536, see St John's Libr. v. 20. 6.

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'By what Mr Baker says, this Article might have been omitted, but as he was Master of Pembroke he comes within my design. I do not known what arms that college assigns him: but his real arms are, party per Saltire azure and gules, a lion of England in the nombril point, and 2 fleurs de lis in pale, or, in chief and in base, or. v. Thorpe's Registrum 45 Roffense, where these arms are on his monument in Bromley church p. 811, being the same as in my antient authentic MS. heraldry book,

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P. 252 1. 11. Jo. COLDWELL. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 220.

In the church of Feversham lies a stone, partly covered, so that the date is imperfect, for Richard Colwell formerly mayor of Feversham : it was before the reformation, by the precatory form on it. Lewis' Hist. and Antiq. of Feversham, p. 17.

p. 289, and were born also by Rd. Young Bp. of Rochester in the time of Henry 4, 1404, as in a curious authentic pedigree of my half brother, Dr Stephen Apthorp, now vice provost of Eton College, allied to the family, and the arms beautifully painted in colours. See also Morgan's Sphere of Gentry, Lib. 2. p. 109.' WM. COLE. Aug. 15, 1777.

P. 250 1. 32. RI. HOWLAND. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 287. On the 4th Oct. 1573 he took pains to refell (not resell, as printed) in an afternoon sermon at St Mary's a puritan discourse delivered there in the morning by Myllane (?) of Christ's college (Heywood and Wright, Cambr. Univ. Trans. I. 157).

P. 251 1. 21. HUGH BELLOT. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. 11. 204, 548.

'I have assigned him the same arms as used by the family of Bellot of Morton in Cheshire, from whence he is said to be descended.' COLE. 1777.

Wм,

'In a certificate of lands belonging to the monastery of Feversham, printed in the appendix to Jacob's History of the Town and Port of Feversham, London, 8. 1774, p. 198, among the fees paid to several officers is this entry, though no date is put to it. To Robt. Coldwell receiver of the ferms and rents of the same town £2 138. 4d. See some further account of him in other words by Mr Baker in a letter to Mr Strype, No. 132, p. 229.

'John Coldwell, who is called in the parish register Mr Dr Coldwell, was rector of Tunstall in Kent 1577, Mr Rowe More's History of Tunstall in Topographica Bibliotheca Britannica, p. 55. I suppose the same person as the bp. "In 1576 Ralph son of John Coldwall parson" Regr. of Tunstall, p. 91.

"Wm. son of John Coldwall parson born 1577." Ib. 92. "Joane wife of Mr Dr Coldwall parson ob. 28 Dec. buried 29" Ib.

'John Coldwell was rector of Winwick in Lancashire in 1580. Qu. Peck's Desid. Cur. Vol. 1st. Lib. 3 p. 21; but at p. 48 Lib. called John Caldwell 1585.' WM. COLE,

P. 252 1. 21. fitque collegii villicus apud Ospring. See pp. 388 1. 23, 392 1. 1, 399 1. 7.

40 P. 253 1. 8. Jo. STILL. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 467. Dr Alablaster married his niece (Fuller's Worthies, 8vo. ed. 111. 185); Sir Jo. Harrington was his pupil (ibid. 103).

P. 253 1. 33. WM. MORGAN. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 393.

P. 254 1. 29. RI. VAUGHAN. See Cooper's Ath. Cant. II. 450. He drew up the Lambeth Articles (Heylin's Laud. 193). See Owen's Epigr.

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IV. 265; a Latin letter to the university 29 Dec. 1604 (Heywood and Wright Cambr. Univ. Trans. 11. 217, 218).

P. 255 1. 22. 'I am pleased with the character Mr Baker gives of bp. Hacket's book, which, for the reason here alleged, I could never relish; you have too many flowers to have much fruit.' WM. COLE.

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P. 255 l. 24. Jo. JEGON. See Calendars of State Papers; Masters' Hist.
C. C. C. C. 126-131; Index to Strype and to Lansd. MSS.; Blomefield's
Norfolk; Brydges Restituta II. 241. In the registry are two small 4to.
vols. of letters to and from him when v. c. transcribed in MS. Baker
XXIV. 345-388; XXVII. I-36; XXXIV. 340–342; IV. 111, 112=A 10

121-124.

Fuller's Worthies of Essex 1. 506, 507:

'John Jegon was born in this county, at Coxhall; fellow first of Queens', then master of Bennet College, in Cambridge, and three times vice-chancellor of the university. A most serious man, and grave 15 governor; yet withal of a most facetious disposition; so that it was hard to say whether his counsel was more grateful for the soundness, or his company more acceptable for the pleasantness, thereof. Take one eminent instance of his ingenuity.

'Whilst master of the college, he chanced to punish all the under- 20 graduates therein for some general offence; and the penalty was put upon their heads in the buttery. And because that he disdained to convert the money to any private use, it was expended in new whiting the hall of the college. Whereupon a scholar hung up these verses on the screen : 25

Doctor Jegon, Bennet College master,

Brake the scholars' head, and gave the walls a plaister. 'But the doctor had not the readiness of his parts any whit impaired by his age; for, perusing the paper, extempore he subscribed,

Knew I but the wag that writ these verses in a bravery,

I would commend him for his wit, but whip him for his knavery. 'Queen Elizabeth designed him, but king James confirmed him, bishop of Norwich; where, if some in his diocese have since bestowed harsh language on his memory, the wonder is not great, seeing he was a somewhat severe presser of conformity; and died anno Domini 1618', 35 i. e. 13 Mar. 1617.

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P. 255 1. 36. Benj. Carier. See Masters, 259-264 and App. No. 69; index to Strype; letters to him in Casauboni Epist. n. 912, 924; cf. ibid. n. 1045, p. 609, and p. 484 b. On his death in France, A.D. 1614, see Sir H. Wotton's Remains, 438. Casauboni Ephemerides pp. 763 40 1. 5, 1013 1. 8, 1233. Six letters to Casaubon, ibid. 1182-1189. Domestic chaplain to abp. Whitgift (Paule's Whitg. § 134; Strype's Whitg. Lib. 4 c. 32, pp. 581, 582). Converted to Romanism chiefly by reading Bellarmine's books (see his letter to Bellarmine with the reply in Hen. Mori Hist. Soc. Jes. 402 seq.). On his disappointment 45 when a candidate for the mastership of Benet coll. see MSS. Baker VI. 29, 33=B 26, 29; xx. 87.

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20 P. 257 l. 14. RI. NEILE. See Alumni Westm. 15; Surtees' Durham, IV. 157 seq.; Calendars of State Papers; index to Laud's Works: index to Durham High Commission (Surtees Soc. 1858); his letter to the college of physicians about Jo. Lambe the quack (Goodall's Coll. Phys. 398 seq., where read 1617 for 1627); 3 original Latin letters to Casaubon in MS. Burney 365 f. 237; letter (Savoy 16 July 1607) asking to be allowed as lord Cranbourne's proxy to take his M.A. degree at Cambridge (MS. Baker XXIX. 387): letter to him (misdirected to Ri. Sterne) in G. J. Vossii Epist. p. 106; Laud's letters to him (Prynne's Canterb. Doome 77, 78, 411; cf. Heylin's Laud 64, 65); Walter Holmes' Septimana Epigrammatum Richardo Episc. Durh. MS. Addit. 11, 039; Winwood's Memorials II. 141; Rushworth 1. 621; index to Nichols' Progresses of James I. Bishop of Rochester, his patronage of learned divines (Heylin's Laud, 54-56, 59, 60, 68, 69); author of Spalato's Shiftings etc. (ib. 103); falling sick early in 1625, procures Laud's appointment as clerk of the closet (ibid. 134); advanced to the privy council by Laud (ibid. 160); commissioner to exercise Abbot's jurisdiction (ibid. 161); bp. of Winchester (ibid. 165, 166); a patron of Arminians (ibid. 171); charges against him in the commons (ibid. 186); abp. of York (ibid. 214); he died 31 Oct. 1640. Heylin (Laud 431=459, 460 of ed. 1668) gives the following character of him: With little-better Fortune did the Convocation take beginning at S. Paul's Church on the morrow after, handselled at their first meeting by the sad news of the Decease of Dr. Neile, Archbishop of York, which had been brought unto the Town the day before. A man he was who had past through all Degrees and Orders in the Church of England, and thereby made acquainted with the conveniences, or distresses, incident to all conditions. He had served the Church as Schoolmaster, Curate, Vicar, Parson, Master of the Savoy, Dean of Westminster, Clerk of the Closet to both Kings successively, Bishop of Rochester, Lichfield, Lincoln, Durham,

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Jos. Hall's Honour of the married clergy. bk. 1. s. 3: Neither is it long since our kind apostate, M. Carier, gave us here in England from bigger men than himself an overture of the likelihood of this liberal dispensation from his Holy Father of Rome, upon the conditions of our re-subjection. Would we therefore but stoop to kiss the carbuncle of that sacred toe, our clergy might as well consist with holy wedlock as the Grecian'.

P. 256 1. 12. WM. BARLOW. He preached before convocation 1601 (Fuller's Ch. Hist. ed. Brewer v. 249). On his Hampton Court Conference (reprinted by Cardwell) see Heylin's Hist. Preb. 373, 374 and Baker's note on A. 15. 13 coll. Jo.; no traitor (Bancroft's Daungerous Positions, 39). Attack on him by Andr. Melvill (Cambr. MS. Gg. i. 29 art. 5). Mr Browne Willis takes notice that when they repaired bp. Wm. Barlow's tomb at Buckden, they placed the real arms of Barlow of Barlow in Lancashire, being sable, an eagle with two heads displayed, sitting on a ragged stock, argent, in the room of those of Barlow bp. of Chichester in Edward 6 time: which no doubt was rightly done; as Mr Baker observes that he was of an ancient family in Lancashire.' WM. COLE. 1777

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