Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge, Volume 8

Front Cover
David Patrick, William Geddie
W. & R. Chambers, limited, 1926 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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Page 360 - The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments, and other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church, according to the Use of the Church of England ; together with the Psalter or Psalms of David, pointed as they are to be sung or said in Churches ; and the Form or Manner of making, ordaining, and consecrating of Bishops, Priests, and Deacons V] Penalty for And that all and every such person, who shall (without 6lng.
Page 30 - We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop.
Page 356 - Thus, we come down to what is tangible and practical as the root of every real distinction of thought, no matter how subtile it may be; and there is no distinction of meaning so fine as to consist in anything but a possible difference of practice.
Page 41 - I think, is a thinking intelligent being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing, in different times and places...
Page 267 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on...
Page 241 - Powhatan: then as many as could laid hands on him, dragged him to them, and thereon laid his head, and being ready with their clubs, to beat out his brains, Pocahontas, the King's dearest daughter, when no entreaty could prevail, got his head in her arms, and laid her own upon his to save him from death...
Page 361 - THE body of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was given for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life ! Take and eat this in remembrance that Christ died for thee ; and feed on him in thy heart by faith with thanksgiving.
Page 159 - The length of the peacock, from the tip of the bill to the end of the tail', is about three feet eight inches.
Page 170 - Lincoln had been a member of the Convention that framed the Constitution of the United States, and...
Page 42 - If a lady or gentleman be introduced to her in the old state, and vice versa (and so of all other matters), to know them satisfactorily she must learn them in both states. In the old state, she possesses fine powers of penmanship ; while in the new she writes a poor awkward hand, having not had time or means to become expert.

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