The Garland, Or Token of Friendship

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Emily Percival
Z. & B.F. Pratt, 1848 - Gift books

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Page 105 - And bathed with many a tear : Fast falling o'er the primrose pale So morning dews appear. But, oh ! his sister's jealous care, A cruel sister she, Forbade what Emma came to say ;
Page 138 - Brood not on insults or injuries old, For thou art injurious too, — Count not their sum till the total is told, For thou art unkind and untrue : And if all thy harms are forgotten, forgiven, Now mercy with justice is met...
Page 183 - hear me out — as I have begun, you shall know all. I did love another, a being all candor, openness, honor and principle ; talented, accomplished, gay, full of feeling, and generous to a fault. His name my mother would not hear me mention. She expelled him our house, excluded him from my society. What then ? — trick and evasion on my part supplanted obedience and sincerity. The house of a friend afforded opportunities for our meeting, which my own denied — my youthful spirit could not bear...
Page 109 - True to his charge, the close-packed load behind, Yet careless what he brings, his one concern Is to conduct it to the destined inn, And, having dropped the expected bag, pass on. He whistles as he goes, light-hearted wretch, Cold and yet cheerful: messenger of grief Perhaps to thousands, and of joy to some, To him indifferent whether grief or joy.
Page 199 - We didn't think it long, Fan," said Charles, " because we really were talking on a very interesting subject — we were discussing you." " Oh, my dear Charles !" exclaimed the lady, " you flatter me; and what did he say of me?" said she, addressing me. " That," said I, " I cannot tell you : I never betray anything that is told me in confidence." Her looks explained that she was particularly glad to hear me say so, and the smile which followed was gracious in the extreme. " Now," said Charles, " that...
Page 177 - we shall travel alone for the rest of the journey — our communicative friends have left us." She made no answer; but from the sort of expression which passed over her features, I was very sorry I had made the remark. I was in the greatest possible alarm lest she should require the presence of her maid to play propriety ; but no, she had no such notion. A summons from Mr. Goodman soon put the party in motion, and in a few minutes we were again on our journey — the dear interesting creature and...
Page 185 - Upon this last part of my fair friend's inquiry as to the lex talionis, I could have but one opinion to give, and agreed cordially in her view of a case to which, as it appeared to me, she had devoted some considerable portion of her attention. " But," said I, " you are now returning home?" " I am," replied the lady ; " because the rival I am doomed to bear with is no longer in London, and because the avocations of my husband will not permit him to visit Paris, whither she is gone. He thinks I am...
Page 190 - I should at least have the trouble, or pleasure, as the case might be, of hunting after my intelligence. Failing in the main point of my inquiries, I endeavoured to ascertain what part of London she resided in, and tried every street, square, row, and corner, from Grove-road, Paddington, to Dog-row, Whitechapel, in order to excite an affirmative nod, and one of those bewitching smiles which I began to love— but no. Well, thought I, the time must come when you must go, and then I shall follow ;...
Page 191 - said the husband. " Yes, dear," said the wife ; " and so tired. I never was so glad to get out of a coach in my life." In a moment I thought I recognized the voice of the husband. I coiled myself into the corner. She would have got out without my being betrayed...
Page 191 - ... that heart was doomed to beat. The moment arrived, and we reached the Elephant and Castle. The sudden check of Goodman's team took my poor Fanny by surprise, and threw her forward, so as to bring her somewhat in contact with myself; but the lamps of the coach had been lighted at Smithers-bottom, and we were in the dark, compared with objects without; and never shall I forget the hurried scramble into which she

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