World Religions for Healthcare Professionals

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Siroj Sorajjakool, Mark F Carr, Ernest Bursey
Routledge, Feb 10, 2017 - Social Science - 226 pages
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Religious beliefs and customs can significantly shape patients' and professionals' attitudes toward, and expectations of, healthcare, as well as their wishes and personal boundaries regarding such daily matters as dress, diet, prayer and touch. Undoubtedly, the sensitivity with which clinicians communicate with patients and make decisions regarding appropriate medical intervention can be greatly increased by an understanding of religious as well as other forms of cultural diversity.

This second edition of a popular and established text offers healthcare students and professionals a clear and concise overview of health beliefs and practices in world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, Sikhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Adopting a consistent structure, each chapter considers the demographic profile of the community, the religion’s historical development, and key beliefs and practices, including views regarding health and sickness, death, and dying. Each chapter also ends with a useful checklist of advice on what to do and what to avoid, along with recommendations for further reading, both online and in print form.

The book’s clear and consistent style ensures that readers with little background knowledge can find the information they need and assimilate it easily. A brand new chapter on applications and a set of new case studies illustrating issues in clinical practice enhance this wide-ranging book’s value to students and practitioners alike.

 

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Contents

Cover
From conceptual to concrete
American Indian religions
Hinduism
Buddhism
Chinese religions
Sikhism
Islam
Judaism

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About the author (2017)

Siroj Sorajjakool has studied and taught world religions in university and healthcare settings for over 25 years. He is a professor in the School of Religion at Loma Linda University.

Mark F. Carr has studied and taught in the areas of religion, theology, ethics, and bioethics for over 20 years. He also has a number of related publications. He holds a clinical ethics and administrative position at Providence Health and Services, Alaska.

Ernest J. Bursey has studied and taught in the areas of religion, theology, New Testament, and healthcare for over 40 years. He teaches on these topics at the Adventist University of Healthcare Sciences.

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