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DISCOURSE VI.

ON THE CONTEST FOR AN ASCENDENCY OVER

MAN, AMONGST THE HIGHER ORDERS OF IN

TELLIGENCE.

Page

“ And having spoiled principalities and powers, he

made a show of them openly, triumphing over
them in it." _Col. ii. 15.

189

DISCOURSE VII.

ON THE SLENDER INFLUENCE OF MERE TASTE AND

SENSIBILITY, IN MATTERS OF RELIGION.

6 And lo! thou art unto them as a very lovely song of

one that hath a pleasant voice, and can play well
on an instrument; for they hear thy words, but
they do them not.”—Ezek. xxxiii. 32.

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DISCOURSE I,

A SKETCH OF THE MODERN ASTRONOMY.

When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers,

the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained ; What is man, that thou art mindful of him ? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?" Psalm viii, 3, 4.

a

In the reasonings of the Apostle Paul, we cannot fail to observe, how studiously he accommodates his arguments to the pursuits or principles or prejudices of the people whom he was addressing. He often made a favourite opinion of their own the starting point of his explanation; and educing a dexterous but irresistible

1; train of argument from some principle upon which each of the parties had a common understanding, did he force them out of all their opposition, by a weapon of their own choosing

B

nor did he scruple to avail himself of a Jewish peculiarity, or a heathen superstition, or a quotation from Greek poetry, by which he might gain the attention of those whom he laboured to convince, and by the skilful application of which, he might “ shut them up unto the faith.”

Now, when Paul was thus addressing one class of an assembly, or congregation, another class might, for the time, have been shut out of all direct benefit and application from his arguments. When he wrote an Epistle to a mixed assembly of Christianized Jews and Gentiles, he had often to direct such a process of argument to the former, as the latter would neither require nor comprehend. Now, what should have been the conduct of the Gentiles: at the reading of that part of the Epistle which bore almost an exclusive reference to the Jews ? Should it be impatience at the hearing of something for which they had no relish or understanding ? Should it be a fretful disappointment, because every thing that was said, was not said for their edification ? Should it be angry discontent with the Apostle, because, leaving them in

the dark, he had brought forward nothing for them, through the whole extent of so many successive chapters ? Some of them may have felt in this way; but surely it would have been vastly more Christian to have sat with meek and unfeigned patience, and to have rejoiced that the great apostle had undertaken the management of those obstinate prejudices, which kept back so many human beings from the par. ticipation of the Gospel. And should Paul have had reason to rejoice, that, by the success of his arguments, he had reconciled one or any number of Jews to Christianity, then it was the part of these Gentiles, though receiving no direct or personal benefit from the arguments, to have blessed God, and rejoiced along with him.

Conceive that Paul were at this moment alive, and zealously engaged in the work of pressing the Christian religion on the acceptance of the various classes of society. Should he not still have acted on the principle of being all things to all men ? Should he not have aca commodated his discussion to the prevailing

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