Brand's Popular Antiquities of Great Britain: Faiths and Folklore; a Dictionary of National Beliefs, Superstitions and Popular Customs, Past and Current, with Their Classical and Foreign Analogues, Described and Illustrated, Volume 2

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John Brand, Henry Ellis, William Carew Hazlitt
Reeves and Turner, 1905 - Fasts and feasts
 

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Page 379 - Tickling a parson's nose as a' lies asleep, Then dreams he of another benefice; Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep; and then anon Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes; And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again.
Page 378 - O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you. She is the fairies' midwife ; and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate-stone On the fore-finger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep : Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners...
Page 548 - ... and Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat, and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat, and shall send him away by the hand of a fit man into the wilderness : And the goat shall bear upon him all their iniquities unto a land not inhabited : and he shall let go the goat in the wilderness.
Page 397 - Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail, bounteous May, that dost inspire Mirth, and youth, and warm desire ; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and...
Page 378 - Time out of mind the fairies' coach-makers. And in this state she gallops night by night Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love : O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on court'sies straight: O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees : O'er ladies...
Page 368 - A KING is a thing Men have made for their own Sakes, for quietness' sake. Just as in a Family one Man is appointed to buy the Meat...
Page 401 - ... having of May games, Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used: so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service...
Page 351 - And there was not a cloud in the sky. He drank of the water so cool and clear, For thirsty and hot was he, And he sat down upon the bank Under the willow-tree.
Page 606 - We also wrote our lovers' names upon bits of paper, and rolled them up in clay, and put them into water ; and the first that rose up was to be our valentine. Would you think it ? — Mr Blossom was my man. I lay abed and shut my eyes all the morning, till he came to our house ; for I would not have seen another man before him for all the world.
Page 361 - tis a fast, to dole Thy sheaf of wheat And meat Unto the hungry soul. It is to fast from strife, From old debate And hate To circumcise thy life. To show a heart grief-rent ; To starve thy sin, Not bin ; And that's to keep thy Lent.

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