The Religious and Romantic Origins of Psychoanalysis: Individuation and Integration in Post-Freudian Theory

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 23, 1996 - Psychology - 240 pages
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This book considers the cultural and religious sources of contemporary psychoanalytic theories of the development of the self, and demonstrates that they are distinctively Western cultural constructions that tell a story in terms of a narrative pattern derived from biblical and Neoplatonic sources. Thus, religious themes and values still influence how modern psychologists make sense of the human condition, and Dr. Kirschner raises provocative questions about the status of psychoanalytic theories as knowledge and as science.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Towards a cultural genealogy of psychoanalytic developmental psychology
3
The assenting echo AngloAmerican values in contemporary psychoanalytic development psychology
33
The developmental narrative The design of psychological history
63
Theological sources of the idea of development
95
The Christian mystical narrative Neoplatonism and Christian mysticism
115
Jacob Boehme Towards worldly mysticism
130
Romantic thought From worldly mysticism to natural supernaturalism
149
Personal supernaturalism The cultural genealogy of the psychoanalytic developmental narrative
179
Conclusion
193
Bibliography
210
Index
233
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