Tapeworms, Lice, and Prions: A Compendium of Unpleasant Infections

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OUP Oxford, 2014 - Health & Fitness - 602 pages
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From tapeworms and lice to fungi and down to tiny viruses, we are surrounded by agents of infectious disease which can be caught from other people, animals, and the environment. The variety of such agents is enormous and their methods of infection often ingenious. Some have life cycles that also involve non-human hosts. The discovery of these agents of disease has involvede luck and accident as well as didication, even on occasion to the point of self-experimentation. David Ian Grove brings together here the stories of most of the major infectious agents, describing their nature, how they were discovered, and the lives of their discoverers. The result is an enormously rich and highly readable compendium full of fascinating accounts of the discoveries that have profoundly altered medicine over the past two centuries. -- from dust jacket.
 

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Contents

INFECTION the search for its causes
1
WORMS
4
ARTHROPODS
63
FUNGI
79
PROTOZOA
95
BACTERIA
172
VIRUSES
424
PRIONS
535
UNDE VENIS ET QUO VADIS?
549
REFERENCES
553
GLOSSARY
571
NOTES ON PRONUNCIAT I O N
578
FURTHER READING
579
FIGURECREDITS
581
Copyright

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About the author (2014)


David Grove, Retired, formerly Clinical Professor of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

David Ian Grove graduated in medicine and surgery from the University of Adelaide in 1967, and was later awarded the degrees of doctor of medicine by that university and doctor of science by the University of Western Australia. He has a diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene from the University of Sydney and is a Fellow of both the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. He has worked in Australia, Papua New Guinea, the USA, the Philippines and the UK. For the 18 years prior to his retirement, he was director of the department of clinical microbiology and infectious diseases at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia and clinical professor of microbiology and of infectious diseases in the University of Adelaide. He has written over 190 original articles and chapters in books, edited Strongyloidiasis: A Major Roundworm Infection of Man and written the acclaimed A History of Human Helminthology.

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