An Enquiry Into the Life and Writings of Homer

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E. Dilly, 1757 - Epic poetry, Greek - 346 pages
 

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Page 24 - En resolución, todos los poetas antiguos escribieron en la lengua que mamaron en la leche, y no fueron a buscar las extranjeras para declarar la alteza de sus conceptos...
Page 66 - That of all the members of mankind that live within the compass of a thousand years, for one man that is born capable of making a great poet, there may be a thousand born capable of making as great generals and ministers of state as any in story.
Page 92 - As for the gods whence each of them was descended, or whether they were always in being, or under what shape or form they existed, the Greeks knew nothing till very lately. Hesiod and Homer were, I believe, about four hundred years older than myself, and no more, and these are the men who made a theogony for the Greeks ; who gave the gods their appellations, defined their qualities, appointed their honours, and described their forms ; as for the poets, who are said to have lived before these men,...
Page 147 - D'Avenant had rejected the marvellous from his poem — that is, the machinery of the epic : he had resolved to compose a tale of human beings for men. ' ' This was," says Blackwall, another of the classical flock, "like lopping off a man's limb, and then putting him upon running races." Our formal critics are quite lively in their dulness on our " adventurer." But poets, in the crisis of a poetical revolution, are more legitimate judges than all such critics. Waller and Cowley applaud D'Avenant...
Page 95 - Fuit haec sapientia quondam, Publica privatis secernere, sacra profanis; Concubitu prohibere vago ; dare jura maritis ; Oppida moliri ; leges incidere ligno : Sic honor et nomen divinis vatibus atque 400 Carminibus venit.
Page 29 - Subject ftill remaining to us, if we will quit our Towns, and look upon it : We find it, accordingly, nobly executed by many of the Moderns, and the...
Page 254 - The Phenician accounts of thefe enchanting Creatures ; their telling how ravifhingly they fung, and how many Crews had been loft thro' their means, was ground fufficient for the Poet : They both gave him a foundation for his Tale, and fcope to work it up in the fymbolical Egyptian manner, until it loft its Specialities, and from a private Story, became capable of a general Application. THERE were feveral Syrens up and down the Coaft, who waited for the paffing Ships, and for that end took their ftations...
Page 263 - Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage. Far off from these, a slow and silent stream, Lethe, the...
Page 19 - But let us be ingenuous, my lord, and confess, that while the moderns admire nothing but pomp, and can think nothing great or beautiful, but what is the produce of wealth, they exclude themselves from the pleasantest and most natural images that adorned the old poetry. State and form disguise man; and wealth and luxury disguise nature.
Page 26 - Triffino defcribes Italy, and dwells on Lombardy. He has even attempted Fable , and interwoven allegorical Stories of Life and Morals, with the Body of the Narration. But after all, the native Italian Manners are loft ; and the high Spirit and fecret Force which bewitches a Reader, and dazzles his Eyes, that he he can fee no Faults in Dante and Ariojlo, isSect.

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