History of the 27th Regiment N.Y. Vols: Being a Record of Its More Than Two Years of Service in the War for the Union, from May 21st, 1861 to May 31st, 1863. With a Complete Roster, and Short Sketches of Commanding Officers. Also, a Record of Experience and Suffering of Some of the Comrades in Libby and Other Rebel Prisons

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Carl & Matthews, printers, 1888 - New York (State) - 303 pages
History of the 27th regiment N.Y. vols. Being a record of its more than two years of service in the war for the union, from May 21st, 1861 to May 31st, 1863. With a complete roster, and short sketches of commanding officers. Also, a record of experience and suffering of some of the comrades in Libby and other Rebel prisons. Compiled by C.B. Fairchild, of company "D". Published under the direction of the following committee: Gen. H.W. Slocum. Capt. C.A. Wells.
 

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Page 133 - Portsmouth and which excepted parts are for the present left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued and by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid i do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated states and parts of states are and henceforward shall be free and that the executive government of the united states including the military and naval authorities thereof will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons...
Page 181 - I have read a fiery gospel writ in burnished rows of steel; "As ye deal with my contemners, so with you my grace shall deal ;" Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with His heel, Since God is marching on.
Page 133 - Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days, from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people...
Page 139 - I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.
Page 133 - St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina...
Page 181 - Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord: He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored; He hath loosed the fateful lightning of his terrible swift sword: His truth is marching on.
Page viii - I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and aid this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular government ; and to redress wrongs already long enough endured.
Page 139 - I much fear that the spirit which you have aided to infuse into the army, of criticising their commander and withholding confidence from him, will now turn upon you. I shall assist you as far as I can to put it down. Neither you nor Napoleon, if he were alive again, could get any good out of an army while such a spirit prevails in it ; and now beware of rashness. Beware of rashness, but with energy and sleepless vigilance go forward and give us victories.
Page viii - Union, and in every event the utmost care will be observed, consistently with the objects aforesaid, to avoid any devastation, any destruction of, or interference with property, or any disturbance of peaceful citizens in any part of the country...
Page 132 - Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: "That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and...

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