Instructions for Conducting a School, Through the Agency of the Scholars Themselves: Comprising the Analysis of an Experiment in Education, Made at the Male Asylum, Madras, 1879-1796 : Extracted from Elements of Tuition, Part 2, the English School, Or, The History, Analysis, and Application of the New System of Education, Now in the Press

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - An Experiment in Education, made at the Male Asylum of Madras ; suggesting a System by which a School or Family may teach itself under the Superintendence of the Master or Parent.
Page 86 - All sacrifices do but speed forward that great day, when the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth as the waters cover the sea.
Page 67 - I much regret that I was not acquainted with the beauty of his system, till somewhat advanced in my plan; if I had known it, it would have saved me much trouble, and some retrograde movements.
Page 55 - As the judge of the people is himself, so are his officers; and what manner of man the ruler of the city is, such are all they that dwell therein.
Page 81 - SIR, — I have received and laid before the Court of Directors of the East India Company, your letter (No.
Page 67 - Madras, suggesting a system whereby a school or family may teach itself under the superintendence of the master or parent.
Page 11 - From his place (chair or desk) he overlooks the whole school, and gives life and motion to every member of it. He inspects the classes, one by one, and is occupied wherever there is most occasion for his services, and where they will best tell. He is to encourage the diffident, the timid, and the backward; to check and repress the forward and presumptuous: to bestow just and ample commendation upon the diligent, attentive, and orderly, however dull their capacity, or slow their progress; to stimulate...
Page 9 - ... together. The scholar ever finds his own level not only in his class, but also in the ranks of the school, being promoted or degraded from place to place, or class to class, according to his proficiency.
Page 85 - THE greatest improvement in the productive powers of labour, and the greater part of the skill, dexterity, and judgment with which it is any where directed, or applied, seem to have been the effects of the division of labour.
Page 80 - Instructions for conducting a school, through t he agency of the scholars themselves," which, having received Dr. Bell's approbation, are subjoined, as the best directions his royal highness can give for the conduct of the regimental schools of the British army. It is necessary to observe, that, although, in the instructions, boys only are mentioned, yet the female children of the soldiery are also intended to partake of the benefits of this system of education, wherever the accommodations, and other...

Bibliographic information