The Poems of Winthrop Mackworth Praed, Volume 1

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E. Moxon & Company, 1864

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Page 202 - ... Till thou wilt gather roses white To wear around its gems of light. Smile, Lady, smile ! — I will not see Rivers and Hastings bend the knee, Till those bewitching lips of thine Will bid me rise in bliss from mine. Smile, Lady, smile ! — for who would win A loveless throne through guilt and sin 1 Or who would reign o'er vale and hill, If woman's heart were rebel still...
Page 378 - Now the rite is duly done, Now the word is spoken, And the spell has made us one Which may ne'er be broken; Rest we, dearest, in our home, Roam we o'er the heather: We shall rest, and we shall roam, Shall we not? together. From this hour the summer rose Sweeter breathes to charm us; From this hour the winter snows Lighter fall to harm us: Fair or foul — on land or sea — Come the wind or weather, Best and worst, whate'er they be, We shall share together.
Page 61 - But what to me is form or face ? I do not ask the weary worm To give me back each buried grace Of glistening eyes, or trailing tresses ! I only feel that she is here, And that we meet, and that we part ; And that I drink within mine ear, And that I clasp around my heart, Her sweet still voice, and soft caresses ! " Not in the waking thought by day, Not in the sightless dream by night, Do the mild tones and glances play, Of her who was my cradle's light ! But in some twilight of calm weather, She...
Page 196 - twas not to invoke The Spirit that dwelleth there ; If he opened his lips, the words they spoke Had never the tone of prayer. A pious priest might the Abbot seem, He had swayed the crozier well ; But what was the theme of the Abbot's dream, The Abbot were loth to tell.
Page 321 - Childhood's brow, Was the blue heaven that beamed above him. Old Time, in most appalling wrath, That valley's green repose invaded; The brooks grew dry upon his path, The birds were mute, the lilies faded; But Time so swiftly winged his flight, In haste a Grecian tomb to batter, That Childhood watched his paper kite, And knew just nothing of the matter. With curling lip, and glancing eye, Guilt gazed upon the scene a minute...
Page 322 - Don't interrupt my game; I'll taste it, if I must, to-morrow." The MUSE of Pindus thither came, And wooed him with the softest numbers That ever scattered wealth and fame Upon a youthful poet's slumbers ; Though sweet the music of the lay, To CHILDHOOD it was all a riddle, And " Oh," he cried, " do send away That noisy woman with the fiddle.
Page 322 - Childhood watched his paper kite, And knew just nothing of the matter. With curling lip and glancing eye Guilt gazed upon the scene a minute ; But Childhood's glance of purity Had such a holy spell within it, That the dark demon to the air Spread forth again his baffled pinion, And hid his envy and despair, Self-tortured, in his own dominion.
Page 397 - DEAREST, I did not dream, four years ago, When through your veil I saw your bright tear shine, Caught your clear whisper, exquisitely low, And felt your soft hand tremble into mine, That in so brief — so very brief a space, He, who in love both clouds and cheers our life, Would lay on you, so full of light, joy, grace, The darker, sadder duties of the wife, — Doubts, fears, and frequent toil, and...
Page 316 - Watch in the deepest cell Of the foeman's dungeon tower, Till hope's most cherished spell Has lost its cheering power; And sing, while the galling chain On every stiff limb freezes, Of the huntsman hurrying o'er the plain, Of the breath of the mountain breezes.
Page 379 - We shall rest, and we shall roam, Shall we not? together. From this hour the summer rose Sweeter breathes to charm us; From this hour the winter snows Lighter fall to harm us: Fair or foul — on land or sea — Come the wind or weather, Best and worst, whate'er they be, We shall share together. Death, who friend from friend can part, Brother rend from brother, Shall but link us, heart and heart, Closer to each other: We will call his anger play, Deem his dart a feather, When we meet him on our way...

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