The life and times of Hugh Miller

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Rudd & Carleton, 1858 - 346 pages
 

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Page 259 - Love had he found in huts where poor men lie; His daily teachers had been woods and rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Page 341 - He is gone who seem'd so great. Gone; but nothing can bereave him Of the force he made his own Being here, and we believe him Something far advanced in State, And that he wears a truer crown Than any wreath that man can weave him. Speak no more of his renown, Lay your earthly fancies down, And in the vast cathedral leave him. God accept him, Christ receive him.
Page 257 - First, I commend my soul into the hands of God my creator, hoping, and assuredly believing, through the only merits of Jesus Christ my Saviour, to be made partaker of life everlasting; and my body to the earth whereof it is made.
Page 304 - There is no straw given unto thy servants, and they say to us. Make brick: and, behold, thy servants are beaten; but the fault is in thine own people. But he said, Ye are idle, ye are idle: therefore ye say, Let us go and do sacrifice to the LORD.
Page 332 - No more? A monster then, a dream, A discord. Dragons of the prime, That tare each other in their slime. Were mellow music match'd with him. O life as futile, then, as frail! O for thy voice to soothe and bless ! What hope of answer, or redress ? Behind the veil, behind the veil.
Page 303 - In every thoroughfare, up almost every alley, and down almost every turning, some doleful bell was throbbing, jerking, tolling, as if the Plague were in the city and the dead-carts were going round.
Page 260 - The poor Inhabitant below Was quick to learn and wise to know, And keenly felt the friendly glow, And softer flame, But thoughtless follies laid him low, And stain'd his name ! Reader, attend — whether thy soul Soars fancy's flights beyond the pole, Or darkling grubs this earthly hole, In low pursuit ; Know, prudent, cautious self-control Is wisdom's root.
Page 121 - Then O, my first, my only love, The kindliest, dearest, best ! On Him may all our hopes repose,— On Him our wishes rest. His be the future's doubtful day, Let joy or grief befall : In life or death, in weal or woe, Our God, our guide, our all.
Page 298 - Ah! could you but see Bet Bouncer of these parts, you might then talk of beauty. Ecod, she has two eyes as black as sloes, and cheeks as broad and red as a pulpit cushion.
Page 334 - He further said, — ( I may state that I was somewhat similarly affected through the night twice last week, and I examined my trousers in the morning to see if I had been out. Still the terrible sensations were not nearly so bad as they were last night; and I may further inform you, that towards the end of last week, while passing through the Exchange in Edinburgh, I was seized .with such a giddiness that I staggered, and would, I think, have fallen, had I not gone into an entry, where I leaned...

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