Page images
PDF
EPUB

color has been set and made fast or permanent, and, furthermore, so constructed as to permit of readily removing from the apparatus the material after it has been treated, and, furthermore, to permit of transporting the treated material to any point desired.

One of the essential features of the invention is to construct the apparatus without the employment of a vertically-extending rod arranged centrally of an outer receptacle for the dye liquor and extending through a removable perforated bottom plate and a removable perforated compression-plate, the structure just referred to forming a part of the subject-matter of the patents hereinbefore noted, as well as the pending application, hereinbefore noted. It has been found that the employment of this central rod prevents the removal of the treated material, as said material is liable to twist around the rod and retard the removal of the material, as well as the removable bottom plate upon which the material is compressed and supported within the apparatus.

Another of the improvements upon the structures disclosed by the patents hereinbefore noted, as well as said pending application, hereinbefore noted, lies in the manner of retaining the compressure-plate within the apparatus during the operation of dyeing or washing.

DUPLEX DYEING-MACHINE. James A. Willard, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, assignor to Vacuum Dyeing Machine Company. Patent No. 796,382, dated August 1, 1905.

This invention relates to duplex dyeing-machines adapted for the dyeing of raw stock, wool, and similar materials in bulk; and the object thereof is to provide a duplex dyeing-machine whereby the dyeing of one lot of material can be done while another mass which has been dyed is removed from the machine and a new portion to be treated substituted, thereby increasing the output of the dyed material in a given length of time than if the machine was so constructed as to permit of operating upon but one lot of material.

The machine is particularly adapted for dyeing, washing, and fixing dyestuffs upon the material being operated on while said material is submerged at all times, consequently preventing the material coming in contact with air until the color has been set or made fast or permanent, or, in other words, preventing oxidation while the material is being treated.

DYEING-MACHINE. James A. Willard, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, assignor to Vacuum Dyeing Machine Company. Patent No. 796,383, dated August 1, 1905.

The object of the invention is to construct an apparatus or machine which is particularly adapted for dyeing, washing, and fixing dyestuffs upon the material being operated on, while it is submerged, at all times and without the material coming in contact with air until the color has been set and made fast or permanent; furthermore, so constructed as to permit of readily removing from the machine the material after it has been treated and to permit of transporting the treated material to any point desired.

It further aims to provide a dyeing-machine with means to prevent the exit from the machine of dirt, trash, or other matters during the circulation of the dyeing medium—that is to say, to prevent foreign bodies entering the pipe system to clog the same during the circulation of the dyeing medium.

The dyeing-machine is provided with new and novel means for retaining the compression top plate in position and to further provide means to deflect the dye liquor as it is supplied to the bottom of the vat below the material-supporting plate.

DYEING APPARATUS. James Marshall, of Fall River, Massachusetts. Patent No, 796,668, dated August 8, 1905.

This invention relates to improvements in dyeing and clearing vats in which articles to be treated are immersed in a succession of liquid solutions designed to set the color or to wash or clear the fabrics from any extraneous matter.

The machine consists of two vats having similar side and end sections placed end to end and holding a liquid solution adapted for successive application to the articles treated.

Above them is a third vat, having substantially the same width, of suitable depth. This vat holds hot or cold water or any solution desirable for washing or clearing the fabrics from any extraneous matter. These vats are arranged in upper and lower divisions supported by a substantial frame, as shown.

By a system of frames and link-belts the machine is arranged so that the material is transferred from one vat to the other, automatically making the process continuous, so that each article is treated exactly alike as to length of immersion and manipulation in the several solutions.

DYER'S JIGGER. Carl Herminghaus, of Hilden, and Carl Gruschwitz, of Olbersdorf, Germany. Patent No. 801,871, dated October 17, 1905.

This invention relates to improvements in jiggers as employed in dyeing fabrics in the open width. The machine differs from prior apparatus for the same purpose, inasmuch as the dye, prepared in the vat itself, is forced against the traveling fabric by means of nozzles which suck the dye directly from the vat.

The jets play upon the fabric traveling past them until the dyeing process is completed.

By means of the new apparatus, guarantee is offered for perfectly uniform all-through dyeing, so that even small quantities of fabric can be dyed by means of the new machine, whereas with prior apparatus there is always the disadvantage that the edges and ends of the fabric show a different color to that of the remaining part.

YARN-PRINTING MACHINE.

Wayne K. Hawk, of Falls of Schuylkill, Pennsylvania, assignor to Nazar Costikyan, of New York, N. Y. Patent No. 802,809, dated October 24, 1905.

The invention relates to machines for producing printed yarns such as are used by carpet-manufacturers in making tapestry and velvet carpets, rugs, and like fabrics.

The object of the invention is to provide a new and improved yarn-printing machine arranged to permit printing yarns of any desired length, and more especially such as are required in the weaving of large rugs known as art-squares,” the arrangement being such that the same printing-drum will answer in printing long or short yarn.

The claims cover the details of construction.

DYEING APPARATUS.

Gustave A. Friedrichs, of Woonsocket, Rhode Island, assignor of one-half to Charles A. Proulx, of Woonsocket, Rhode Island. Patent No. 806,793, dated December 12, 1905.

This invention relates to dyeing apparatus; and it provides a simple and efficient ap tus designed more especially for expeditiously dyeing textile rovings and adapted to be used to advantage in dyeing other materials.

In this machine the material is packed in a basket of net-work, circular in form, and the dye-liquor is forced through it from the centre by means of a perforated supply pipe and a rotary pump.

The claims cover the details of construction.

MACHINE FOR DYEING FABRICS.

Jacques Cadgéne, of Zurich, Switzerland. Patent No. 808,007, dated December 19, 1905. The object of the present invention is to provide a simple and comparatively inexpensive machine of substantial construction to be able to dye various widths of materials—such as fabrics of pure cotton, wool, or zanello—but at the same time its parts have sufficient flexibility to be able to deal with all silk articles, from the most inferior up to the best quality.

Contrary to other systems for dyeing material in the piece, consisting in causing the stuff or material to circulate in the bath by the aid of small internal guide-rollers and of external delivery and receiving rollers of small diameter, the principle of the present system is to cause the stuff or material to travel by means of two cylinders of large diameter moving in the vat, but out of the bath or liquid. The stuff or material winding from and unwinding onto the cylinders during its passage takes up an approximately horizontal position in the bath.

To effect dyeing, short baths are used so that the pieces when they are wound on the cylinders may be always above the bath in order that the stuff makes contact with the dyeing-bath only when the latter in its travel follows an almost horizontal line, and as in this position the stuff offers a great surface in the dyeingbath the following effects are attained: first, rapid dyeing of great uniformity without the least trace of darker tone on the edges of the pieces; second, the material fully utilizes the whole of the coloring-matter and the thread of the stuff is always straight; third, a considerable length of material may be dyed without the accumulated material on the cylinders forming too great a thickness; fourth, much steam is saved in avoiding reheats.

When the pieces have been sufficiently impregnated with color, they may be washed and their colors heightened by filling the vat with water and causing the cylinders to move until complete rinsing is effected. These operations are the more active, as the cylinders work right in the washing or color-heightening water. When all the operations of dyeing are finished, the pieces are wound on an apparatus fixed to one end of the vat, such apparatus acting as a drier or wringer.

« PreviousContinue »