The Life and Correspondence of Field-Marshall Sir George Pollock ... (constable of the Tower)

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W. H. Allen, 1873 - India - 560 pages
 

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Page 550 - He hath a tear for pity, and a hand Open as day for melting charity...
Page 294 - I fear that it would have the very worst efiect — it would be construed into a defeat, and our character as a powerful nation would be entirely lost in this part of the world. It is true that the garrison of Jellalabad has been saved, which it would not have been, had a force not been sent to its relief. But the relief of that garrison is only one object; there still remain others which we cannot disregard — I allude to the release of the prisoners.
Page 440 - Content with the limits nature appears to have assigned to its empire, the Government of India will devote all its efforts to the establishment and maintenance of general peace, to the protection of the sovereigns and chiefs its allies, and to the prosperity and happiness of its own faithful subjects.
Page 294 - With regard to our withdrawal at the present moment, I fear that it would have the very worst effect ; it would be construed into a defeat, and our character as a powerful nation, would be entirely lost in this part of the world. It is true that the garrison of Jellalabad has been saved, which it would not have been, had a force not been sent to its relief; but the relief of that garrison is only one object; there still remain others which we cannot disregard. I allude to the release of the prisoners.
Page 128 - Shuns, encouraged by the presence of their veteran commander, who, unable to walk, was carried from point to point, in a handsomely-gilded litter; and cheered by the example, and earnest exhortations to fight bravely, of the fearless Amazons, offered a brave resistance to the assailants ; but no sooner was a lodgment made in the interior of their crowded works, than confusion ensued, and they were unable longer to contend with, or check the progress of the rapidly-increasing line which formed upon...
Page 439 - The Governor-General will leave it to the Afghans themselves to create a government amidst the anarchy which is the consequence of their crimes.
Page 440 - ... government. Afghanistan and China have seen at once the forces at his disposal, and the effect with which they can be applied. Sincerely attached to peace for the sake of the benefits it confers upon the people, the Governor-General is resolved that peace shall be observed, and will put forth the whole power of the British Government to coerce the state by which it shall be infringed.
Page 278 - Cabool, the scene of our great disaster and of so much crime, even for a week, of the means which it might afford of recovering the prisoners, of the gratification which it would give to the army, and of the effect which it would have upon our enemies. Our withdrawal might then be made to rest upon an official declaration of the grounds upon which we retired as solemn as that which accompanied our advance ; and we should retire as a conquering, not as a defeated, Power...
Page 549 - Be seen upon his post! For in the night, unseen, a single warrior, In sombre harness mailed, Dreaded of man, and surnamed the Destroyer, The rampart wall had scaled.
Page 175 - Pagam-mew, which followed, exhibited the same features of intrepidity and self-devotion. The frequency of these acts of spirited soldiership on the part of his troops, renders it difficult for the Major-general to vary the terms of his praise, but he offers to every officer and soldier engaged this day, the tribute of his thanks, at once with the affection of a commander and cordiality of a comrade.

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