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American States-Letter from Mr. Giles, Member of the Embargo Committee,

to Mr. Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury, Nov. 11, 1908

127

Mr. Gallatin's Answer

128

Report of the Embargo Committee

134

Report of a Committee of the House of Representatives of

Massachusett's, upon the subject of the Embargo, Nov. 15, 1808

143

Battle of Corunna_From the London Gazette Extraordinary, Jan. 24, 1809 153

- Supplement to the above, Jan. 24, 1809

150

Spanish Revolution-Palafox's Proclamation to the Arragonese, Dec. 3, 1803

255, 414

Prussia-Letter of the King to the Magistrates of Berlin, Dec. 24, 1808 459

Cayenne-Capture of Cayenne, Jan. 12, 1809

475

England and Spain-Treaty of Peace between the King of England and Ferdi-
nand 7th, Jan. 14, 1809

506

Swedish Revolution-Proclamation by the Duke of Sudermania, on his assuming

the Government, March 13, 1809

510

- - Proclamation of the Commander of the Troops stationed

at Weimland

510
Proclamation of the Duke of Sudermania, concerning a

General Diet, March 14, 1809

543

Address of the Duke of Sudermania to the People of

Sweden, March 15, 1909

544, 56$

Spain–Extract from the last Letter of Sir John Moore to Lord Castlereagh,

dated Corunna, Jan. 13, 1809

570

Portugal—General Orders issued by Field Marshal Beresford, March 13, 1809 572
Holland-Decree of the King of Holland, prohibiting all Commerce with Eng-
land, Utrecht, March 31, 1809

574

Spanish Revolution Decree of the Supreme Junta, granting no Quarter to the

French, Feb. 7, 1809

576, 793

Turkey-Treaty between Great Britain and the Sublime Porte

798

Austria-Proclamation of the Archduke Charles, Vienna, April 6, 1809 - 825

First Bulletin of the French Army, Ratisbon, April 24, 1809 - 827,860

Second, Muhldorf, April 27, 1809

862

Third, Burghausen, April 30

890

Fourth, Brannau, May 1

891

Fifth, Ems, May 4

892

Sixth, Saint Polten, May 9

895, 945

Seventh, Vienna, May 13

945

Eighth, Vienna, May-14

948

Ninth, Vienna, May 19

953

Tenth, Ebersdorff, May 23

954

Eleventh, Ebersdorff, May 24

959

Twelfth, Ebersdorff, May 26

960, 992

Thirteenth, Ebersdorff, May 28

1013

Fourteenth, Ebersdorff, June 1

· 1015

Fifteenth, Ebersdorff, June 2

- 1017

Sixteenth, Ebersdorff, June 4

• 1017

Seventeenth, Vienna, June 8

. 1017

· Eighteenth, Vienna, June 13

· 1020

Austría-Second Bulletin of the Austrian Army, Alt Deuting, April 12, 1809 - 1020

Third Bulletin, Vils Biburg, April 15, 1809

. 1021

Fourth, Landshut, April 16, 1809

- '1021

Fifth, Landshut, April 17, 1809

· 1022

Sixth, Sacile, April 17, 1809

· 1023

Seventh Official Report, no Date

. 1024 -

- Eighth Otlicial Report, no Date

1024

Tenth Bulletin, no Date

- 1025

- Eleventh, no Date

1026

6 Twelfth, Warsaw, April 21, 1809

1026

Page

Austrian Army.--Thirteenth Official Report

1027
... Fourteenth Bulletin, no Date

- 1029

America-Orders in Council, relative to the Commerce with the United States,

nited

May 24, 1809

853

Spain-Proclamation of the Supreme Govering Junta to the Spanish Nation,

May 11, 1809

923

King's Speech to the Parliament at the Close of the Session, June 41, 1809 993

PROCEEDINGS IN COUNTIES, Cities, BOROUGHS, &c. RELATIVE TO THE LATE INQUIRY IN

The House of COMMONS, RESPECTING THE CONDUCT OF THE Duke OF YORK.

City of Glasgow, March 14, 1909

454

City of Canterbury, March 21

455

City of Westminster, March 29

502

City of London, April 1

517

City of Rochester, March 27

559

City and County of the City of Gloucester, March 29

560

Town of Calne, March 30

561

Town and Borough of Deal, March 30

562

City of Durham, April 5

562

City of London, Common Council, April 6

563

- County of Middlesex, April 11

564

Town and Borough of Southwark, April 12

566

Town of Godalming, March 27

640

County of Southampton, April 25

64.8

Town and Port of Sandwich, April 7

657

Borough of Annan, April 11

658, 700

Borough of Carmarthen, April 5

701

Town of Sheffield, April 12

702

City of Worcester, April 13

703

County of Berks, April 17

· 725

Town of Northampton, April 17

726

Borough of Derby, April 18

727

Borough of Lewes, April 18

728

Borough of Reading, April 19

729

Town of Kingston upon Hull, April 19

731

Borough of Stafford, April 20 -

732

Town and County of Poole, April 21

733

Town of Maidstone, April 21

733

Borough of Plymouth, April 24

735

City of Coventry, April 25

735

Town of Liverpool, April 21

785

Borough of Ipswich, April 21

786

Borough of Chipping-Wycombe, April 22

787

County of Monmouth, April 28

788

Stewartry of Kircudbright, April 29

789

Town of Manchester, May 3

789

Town of Doncaster, May 3

790

Town of Beverley, May 3

791

County of Huntingdon, May 5

792

Town of Guildford, April 25

792

County of Norfolk, May 2

793

Borough of Boston, May 9

795

County of Hertford, May 13

796

Borough of Warwick, May 16

823

County of Cornwall, May 15

824

Town of Blackburn,

854

County of Wilts, May 17

855

City of Bristol, May 26 -

887

County of Hereford, May 19

888

Town of Huddersfield, May 30

943

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MISCELLANEOUS.

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Hampshire--Mr. Herbert's Address to the Freeholders, &c. of the County of
Southampton, Dec. 21, 1808

S3
West India Dacks--Report from the Committee of Directors on the General

Conduct of the Company's Affairs, to the end of the year 1808, Jan. 6,
1809

115

Reverend Mr. Glasse, relative to the Introduction of his Name into the Evidence

l'especting the Conduct of the Duke of York

314

Sir Francis Burdett's Speech at the Meeting at Westminster Hall, March 30,

1809, for the purpose of thanking Mr. Wardle

535

Dutch Commissioners-Report from the Committee of the House of Commons,

relating to the Dutch Commissioners

623

East India

Company-Report from the Conmittee of the House of Commons, on
the Patronage of the East India Company, March 23, 1809

658

Parliamentary Reform-Resolutions of the Meeting of the Friends of such a

Reforin as would secure to the People the Uses and Reality of Represent-

ation in Parliament, held at the Crown and Anchor Tavern, London,

May 1, 1809

686

Petition of Mr. Hienry White, Proprietor of the Independent Whig, to the House

of Commons, April 24, 1809

692

Report of the Committee who conducted the Westminster Election in 1807, May

,

23, 1809

820

Articles from the American Papers, relative to the Restoration of Intercourse with

America

852

Parliamentary Reform-Speech of the Right Hon. the Speaker of the House of

Commons, June 1, 1809, on Mr. Curwen's Reform Bill

865

Parliairentary Reform-Speech of Sir Francis Burdert, Bart. in the House of

Commons, June 15, 1809, on a Reform oříhat House

965

Essex Meeting

· 1009

Table of the Number of Christenings and Burials; of the Prices of the

Quartern Loaf; of the Prices of Meat, Sugar, Salt and Coals; of the

Prices of the English and French Stocks; and of the Number of Bank-

ruptcies ;.... from Dec. 1808 to May 1809

xii

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ARTICLES BY THE EDITOR.

1

Court of Inquiry
Spanish Revolution.—The Stories from Spain are of a mixed nature.—The Loyal

dishclieve the Corsican's Bulletins.--I believe them.-My reason for so
doing.--Description of your true modern Loyalty.—The movements of
oyr Troops have been hitherto quite unaccountable.—Horse Guards Phi-
losophy.--Unless the People of Spain be let loose Buonaparte will pre-

vail
Mr. Herbert.--His Address to the Electors of Hampshire worthy of notice.-

His answer to the Pledge demanded from hin by me.--He declares he
never will accept of Pension or Sinecure.-But from Place he will not debar
himself by any Pledge.—Persons once chosen to be the Guardians of the
People's Money should never pocket any part of that Money.-Mr. Her-
bert thinks it necessary that Members of Parliament should, at the
same time, be Servants of the King.--This Doctrine proved to be in direct
opposition to the Act of Settlement. Mr. H. says the Debates would be-
come frivolous if the King's Servants were not in the House. The Debates !
All is Debate-If the House of Commons contained no Placemen, can it
be believed, that the Public Money would not be better taken care
of?

33

Page

Spanish Revolution.—The Extracts from Sir J. Moore's Dispatches shew that

our Army is in a perilous situation. The “ Loyal” vomit forth flames of

furious Abuse against those who doubt the goodness of the Disposition of

the Spanish People. But that Abuse will not alter the Fact.—Spain has been

Jost from the dread of Liberty.--A Population of 11 Millions is not to be

subdued by arms, if they have arms to defend themselves, and hearts to

use them

41

Libel Law

Spanish Revolution.—What is the fate that will probably attend our Army in

Spain?-1, for my part, shall think that we are lucky if we avoid a Capi.

tulation.—What diversion has Sir J. Moore made in favour of the Spa-

niards ?- The sort of diversion that would have been made by Lord

Cochrane.–Our Army costs us 23 millions of pounds sterling a year.

The regular Infantry in July last amounted to 100,000, and the Cavalry

to 25,000 men. What is this Army for?-- There can be no maintainable

justification for the measures, or the inactivity which have led to the known

dreadful situation of our Army. Have not this suffering people a right

to demand a knowledge of the cause of this great injury and dis..

grace?

65

“ Loyalty.”—Not volgar Loyalty, but Loyalty, in the modern sense of that Word.

--Proofs of this most estimable quality in the Viscount Castlereagh, and
some of his Relations. Three Millions drawn from the Public, during
the last 30 or 40 years, by six or seven Persons! There's Loyalty for
you! « Jacobins and Levellers” blush for shame! « Jack Cades” hide

your heads.—Real Services of the Cochrane Family

75

Spanish Revolution.—The dismal news is at last arrived. ---My Readers, at any

rate, have from the first been prepared for what has happened.--Jocula-
rity of the publications which have been made in the Ministerial papers
under the title of Speeches made by Lord Castlereagh and Mr. Canning.
-But, while Rome burnt, Nero fiddled; and it is universally true, that
the Monkey and the Tyger meet in the same mind.—Shall no disgrace
attend those who, having all the means of the Country in their hands,planned
the Campaign of Leon and Galicia?-It is grossly false to say that the
Spanish Nation did not wish to be freed from Oppression : we never made
them the offer. We royalized the Cause of Spain, and made it a contest
between King Ferdinand and Joseph.-Dismal close of the Campaign.
Let us never lose sight of this important truth, that to induce a People to
rise in arms against a powerful Invader, they must first, not be told, but

be made to feel, that they have a Country to fight for -

97

108

Duke of York.—Mr. Wardle's Motion for the Appointment of a Committee,

to inquire into the Conduct of the Commander in Chief, with regard to

Promotions and Exchanges in the Army.”—The important Debate of the

27th Jan. thereon.--Observations on the said Debate-Mr. Wardle's

Speech at once concise, plain, and impressive.Sir James Pulteney (wbo

marched against Ferrol), and others, extol the excellent Discipline of the

Army:-Mr. Adam informs the House that “ he had been for 20 Years ac-

quainted with all the Duke's embarrassments, &c." And that therefore

the Accusation must be false.— This Conclusion rather illogical.- The

"heavy responsibility,to which Mr. Wardle had subjected himself.-Mr.

Canning asserts “ that Infamy must attach either upon the Accused or the

Accuser.”-A “ Conspiracy,said to be on foot, for the purpose of talking

and writing down the Duke of York, the Army itself, and all the Esta-

blishments of the Country.-Proofs of the said Conspiracy.-Messrs. Yorke

and Cauniog assert, that there had been a series of Libels published against

the Duke of York.-No man's character white-washed by an appeal to the

Law.—" The Blessings of a Free Press.”_"What is Freedom of the

Press;” The Writers of former times surpassed in boldness those of the

present day.-Instances thereof, from the Works of Pope.-Wby not put

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down those publications? Why not put down the Works of Swift, and,

Gay, and Garth, and Akenside, and Charchill; nay, of poor Johnson;

and of Milton, and Locke, and Paley? --I am resolved, be the consequen-

ces to myself what they muy, to continue to exercise the Freedom of Writ-

ing and of Speaking, as my Forefathers were wont to exercise it, as

long as I have my senses and the power of doing either one or the other.

As witness my hand, William COBEETT.

161

DUKE OF York.-An attempt on foot to deprive us of the remains of our Free-

dom.—A Mr. Wharton, Chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means,

publishes a Pamphlet to inculcate the notion that Jacobinism is revived.

This is an excessively stupid and dirty performance.--My determination

to keep the public attention closely nailed to the Inquiry going on rela-

tive to the Conduct of the Duke of York. - The Debate of the 27th of

January continued.-Mr. Wardle's First Charge respecting the Exchange

of Major Brooke--Examination of Dr. Thynne, Mr. R. Knight, and Mis.

Clarke.--Review of the above Evidence.-Examination of Mr. Adam,

Col. Gordon, and Ludowick Orramin.-Second Examination of Mr.

Adam.-Mr. Adam produces a threatening Letter written in red ink.-

This audacious Letter kindles wrath in the breasts of the Honourable

House. Further Remarks on the cry of “ Foul Conspiracy,” and of

“ Jacobinism.”

193

DUKE OF YORK.—The eyes of every person in the Country directed towards

what is going on in the House of Commons.-Effect which these abomina-

tions have upon the People in their individual and family capacity.-

Mr. Adam's son a Lieutenant Colonel at the age of 21.- The altered lan-

guage and tone of the House of Commons.—Commencement of the public

Complaints made in behalf of the Duke of York against the Press.-

" The Plain Statement” ought now to be re-perused and treasured up in

the Memory.--Extracts therefrom.-Major Hogan's “ Appeal.”- Prose-

cutions resorted to.-An effectual way of silencing the Press.-" The

Duke of Clarence's Birth day" from the Courier Newspaper.-Shocking

effect of such examples. The Debate of the 27th January concluded - 225

Duke of York.-Analysis of the Examinations taken in the House of Commons.

-The Adulterous Intercourse.- The Duke's Letters to Mrs. Clarke.--The

Annuity.--Establishment in Gloucester Place.—Case of Knight and

Brooke.-Case of Captain Maling.–Case of French and Sandon.— Treat-

ment received by Mr. Wardle from the House of Commons

257

DUKE OF YORK.-Remarks on the Re-examination of Miss Taylor.–The Duke

- of York's Letter to the House of Commons.—Strictures thereon.--Exa-

- mination of the Set-offs to the Charges and Evidence against the Duke of

York.--General traffic for Offices and Places under Government

321

To the Reader, on raising the Price of this Publication from Ten-pence to One

Shilling

347

DUKE OF YORK.—The Analysis resumed.-Captain Sandon's Case. Observa-

tions thereon.—Dr. O'Meara's Case.—The Doctor's famous Puff, on his

preaching at Weymouth before Royalty.-Miss Taylor's Case

353

DUKE OF York.–Observations on a passage in Mr. Adam's Speech relating to

my own Conduct respecting his Son.—Debate on the 8th of March.-

Mr. Wardle's Address.—Mr. Perceral's Address.—Mr. Bankes's Amend-

ment.—What is meant by “personal Corruption."-Observations on

Mr. Wardle's Proposition-And on Mr. Bankes's—And on the three

Presumptions which have been set up by the Defenders of the Duke.-

" Popular Clamour”

355

Subseription for Miss Taylor

412

Duke of YORK.--List of the 125 Members who roted for Mr. Wardle's Ad-

dress. Observations on the Debate of the 17th of March.-Hopes en-

tertained that the Duke will reform.-Mr. Canning's threat of Infamy:

--Mr. Canning alludes to an Anecdote relative to an Ancestor of Lord

Folkestone.-Lord Folkestone's reply.-Mr. Canning descended from

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