The Virginia Historical Register, and Literary Note Book, Volumes 3-4

Front Cover
William Maxwell
proprietor, 1850 - Virginia

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Contents

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Page 60 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for not without dust and heat.
Page 228 - This shall be written for the generation to come; and the people which shall be created shall praise the Lord.
Page 140 - I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war. Master Coleridge, like the former, was built far higher in learning, solid, but slow in his performances. CVL, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Page 13 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these, hundred years ; for learning has brought disobedience, and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both l William Waller Hening, Statutes at Large (New York, 1823), II, 511-517.
Page 140 - Then to the well-trod stage anon If Jonson's learned sock be on, Or sweetest Shakespeare, Fancy's child, Warble his native wood-notes wild.
Page 37 - The historic muse, Proud of the treasure, marches with it down To latest times ; and Sculpture, in her turn, Gives bond in stone and ever-during brass To guard them, and to immortalize her trust.
Page 83 - Pass by his troubled senses; sing his pain Like hollow murmuring wind, or silver rain: Into this prince, gently, oh gently slide, And kiss him into slumbers, like a bride.
Page 12 - The same course that is taken in England out of towns; every man according to his ability instructing his children.
Page 108 - The more carefully we examine the history of the past, the more reason shall we find to dissent from those who imagine that our age has been fruitful of new social evils. The truth is, that the evils are, with scarcely an exception, old.
Page 75 - Being born to one of the amplest fortunes in this country, he was sent early to England for his education, where, under the care and direction of Sir Robert Southwell, and ever favored with his particular instructions, he made a happy proficiency in polite and various learning. By the means of the same noble friend he was introduced to the acquaintance of many of the first persons of...

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