London society, Volume 7

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Page 252 - He did not think all mischief fair, Although he had a knack of joking; He did not make himself a bear, Although he had a taste for smoking; And when religious sects ran mad, He held, in spite of all his learning, That if a man's belief is bad, It will not be improved by burning.
Page 247 - A starlight sky was o'er his head, A quiet breeze around ; And the flowers a thrilling fragrance shed, And the waves a soothing sound : It was not an hour, nor a scene, for aught But love and calm delight ; Yet the holy man had a cloud of thought On his wrinkled brow that night. He gazed on the river that gurgled by, But he thought not of the reeds : He clasped his gilded rosary, But he did not tell the beads...
Page 249 - Has hurried me off to the Po, Forget not Medora Trevilian: My own Araminta, say "No!"' We parted ! but sympathy's fetters Reach far over valley and hill; I muse o'er your exquisite letters, And feel that your heart is mine still; And he who would share it with me, love, — The richest of treasures below — If he's not what Orlando should be, love, My own Araminta, say 'No...
Page 267 - The increase of our revenue is the subject of our care, as much as our trade; 'tis that must maintain our force, when twenty accidents may interrupt our trade; 'tis that must make us a nation in India; — without that we are but as a great number of interlopers, united by his Majesty's royal charter, fit only to trade where nobody of power thinks it their interest to prevent us...
Page 247 - And rocks, whose very crags seem bowers, So gay they are with grass and flowers! But the Abbot was thinking of scenery About as much, in sooth, As a lover thinks of constancy, Or an advocate of truth. He did not mark how the skies in wrath Grew dark above his head; He did not mark how the mossy path Grew damp beneath his tread; And nearer he came, and still more near, To a pool, in whose recess The water had slept for many a year, Unchanged and motionless; From the river stream it spread...
Page 213 - Metamorphoses, or some other fabulous writer. Between the pauses or acts of this serious representation, he interwove a comic fable, consisting chiefly of the courtship of Harlequin and Columbine, with a variety of surprising adventures and tricks, which were produced by the magic wand of Harlequin; such as the sudden transformation of palaces and temples to huts and cottages; of men and women into wheel-barrows and joint-stools; of trees turned to houses; colonnades to beds of tulips; and mechanic...
Page 245 - The wreath upon his head, The cross upon his breast, Let the prayer be said, and the tear be shed : So — take him to his rest ! Call ye my Whole, ay, call ! The lord of lute and lay ; And let him greet the sable pall With a noble song to-day ; Go, call him by his name ; No fitter hand may crave To light the flame of a soldier's fame On the turf of a soldier's grave.
Page 344 - I have never committed any offence against you : and it seems hard, in return for the great love I bear you, to be kept at a distance from the person and presence of the woman in the world that I value the most ; and if you love me...
Page 251 - DEAREST, I did not dream, four years ago, When through your veil I saw your bright tear shine, Caught your clear whisper, exquisitely low, And felt your soft hand tremble into mine, That in so brief — so very brief a space, He, who in love both clouds and cheers our life, Would lay on you, so full of light, joy, grace, The darker, sadder duties of the wife, — Doubts, fears, and frequent toil, and constant care For this poor frame, by sickness sore bested; The daily tendance on the fractious chair,...
Page 248 - Bury ! There was turning of keys, and creaking of locks, As he took forth a bait from his iron box. It was a bundle of beautiful things, A peacock's tail and a butterfly's wings, A scarlet slipper, an auburn curl, A mantle of silk, and a bracelet of pearl, And a packet of letters, from whose sweet fold...

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