The Centennial Magazine: An Australian Monthly, Volume 2

Front Cover
Centennial magazine office, 1889
 

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Contents

Selections from a Freshwater Log Alexander Oliver
154
They that go down to the Sea in Ships W Lewers and F C Cowle
159
Memories K MCosh Clark
167
Light Through Light Edith Lamb 1 C
174
Ode to a Violin G S L
182
Loves Tragedy Frances Tyrrell Gill
198
Student Life in Melbourne J Steele Robertson
207
Sonnet J C Bennett
219
Henrik Ibsen Theodore Soderberg 221
226
A Doubters Dole E Vaughan Boulger 132
238
Some LifePartners William A Haswell 45
248
Womens Clubs M L Manning 24
262
Two WattleTimes Jennings Carmichael
270
A Girls Grave P E Quinn
286
Lily Snow Eille Norwood 2 S
295
The Sorrows of Australian Authors A Reply to
300
A Bush Yarn E Hamilton Irving
306
High Schools James Singleton Spalding
313
To Callista W Lewers and F C Cowle
328
Apollo 1 F Armstrong
343
One Alone Edith Lamb 35
353
Nevermore Rolf Boldrewood
363
Love and Sympathy Howard C Coghlan
371
The Shepherds BlessingA Story for Children E Australie Heron
378
The Praying Mantis Louisa A Meredith
384
My Wife Mrs Percy R Meggy
395
New Years Eve in London Streets 0 P
401
Julian Edmund Tennison Woods John Milne Curran F G S 46
412
Wife of Mine J Steele Robertson
420
The Bath Sponge and its Relations Arthur Dendy M Sc F L S
433
The Pessimists Plea Sydney Jephcott
442
To A C David G Falk
450
Nevermore Rolf Boldrewood
458
The Peripatetic Usher W Lewers and F C Cowle
464
The Dramatic Year 1889 Harry St Maur
475
The Riddle of the Sphinx T J Hebblewhite
489
Reporters and their Work Fred H Bathurst
498
The Flight Birds Donald Macdonald 53
510
The Maori Mecca and its Prophet W H Triggs
523
George Rignold Actor Gilbert Parker
536
Short Stories Walter E Adams
641
Our Italian Friend Mrs Richard R Armstrong
652
The Light of Life John Sandes
663
An Unwritten Tale Edward J Hart
672
The Heart of Australia Thomas Heney
684
Nevermore Rolf Boldrewood
693
Sleep L E Orr
701
The Stormy Petrel F W Pennefather
712
On a Wet Racecourse Et cetera Alexander Oliver
721
The Wreck Roderic Quinn
731
The German Villages of South Australia George Sutherland M A
737
The next step in Sanitary Reform Geo A Syme M S F R C S Eng
743
The Rebellion in the KitchenA Reply May L Manning
751
Apropos of Mr R L StevensonA Protest Francis Adams
762
Cremation in the East Edmard Garraway
768
Hevermore Rolf Boldrewood
776
Else our Lives are Incomplete A F Maldon Robb
783
The Government of Universities Professor Edward Jenks
790
Why is there a Woman Question? Zadel Barnes Gustafson
797
An Australian National Anthem J Brunton Stephens
801
La Tarentule Mrs LeithAdamsMrs R S deC Laffan
812
A Reviewer Reviewed W O Hodgkinson M L A
818
In the Botanic Gardens Adelaide Mrs Alfred Broad
825
Marie Bashkirtseff C H Spence
832
Nevermore Rolf Boldrewood
838
Through Dreams to All Poss J Sutton
846
The Ordeal of Faith T J Hebblewhite
855
The Old English Sunday Laws G B Barton
862
Passion Proteus
868
Medical Women Ethel Castilla
875
Literature and its Value in Life Arthur W Jose
881
Lost in Lifes Mine Sydney Jephcott
894
The Abuse of Marriage John Miller
901
A Letter on Ingratitude From the French by Alphonse Karr
911
Nevermore Rolf Boldrewood
918
In Absence J Steele Robertson
927
The Humors of Cobb and Co H Willis
937
Shooting a Ghost William Gay
943
Night Hangs Over the City Richard Hadley
959

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Page 35 - For, don't you mark ? we're made so that we love First when we see them painted, things we have passed Perhaps a hundred times nor cared to see; And so they are better, painted — better to us, Which is the same thing. Art was given for that; God uses us to help each other so, Lending our minds out.
Page 35 - Found eyes and nose and chin for A's and B's, And made a string of pictures of the world Betwixt the ins and outs of verb and noun, On the wall, the bench, the door. The monks looked black. 'Nay,' quoth the Prior, 'turn him out, d'ye say?
Page 35 - I've made her eyes all right and blue, Can't I take breath and try to add life's flash, And then add soul and heighten them three-fold? Or say...
Page 282 - Sea To my sight for four years past. " Four years it is since first I met, 'Twixt the Duchray and the Dhu, A shape whose feet clung close in a shroud, And that shape for thine I knew. "A year again, and on Inchkeith Isle I saw thee pass in the breeze, With the cerecloth risen above thy feet And wound about thy knees. "And yet a year, in the Links of Forth, As a wanderer without rest, Thou cam'st with both thine arms i' the shroud That clung high up thy breast.
Page 35 - Left foot and right foot, go a double step, Make his flesh liker and his soul more like, Both in their order?
Page 283 - Soul's eternity To one dead deathless hour. Look that it be. Whether for lustral rite or dire portent, Of its own arduous fulness reverent : Carve it in ivory or in ebony, As Day or Night may rule ; and let Time see Its flowering crest impearled and orient. A Sonnet is a coin : its face reveals The soul, — its converse, to what Power 'tis due ; — Whether for tribute to the august appeals Of Life, or dower in Love's high retinue. It serve ; or, 'mid the dark wharf's cavernous breath, In Charon's...
Page 33 - If you knew their work you would deal your dole." May I take upon me to instruct you? When Greek Art ran and reached the goal, Thus much had the world to boast...
Page 5 - Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice. And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares that infest the day, Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, And as silently steal away.
Page 5 - The day is done, and the darkness Falls from the wings of Night, As a feather is wafted downward From an eagle in his flight. I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me, That my soul cannot resist: A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain.
Page 499 - The fountains mingle with the river And the rivers with the Ocean, The winds of Heaven mix for ever With a sweet emotion; Nothing in the world is single; All things by a law divine In one another's being mingle.

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