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believe to be, that among those who gelical religion, both on the part of hypocritical possess the spirit of the Free Church

professors and of open infidels. Their zeal has

been inspired not, as they professed, by a love Magazine, the antipathy to their quon

of reformation, but by enmity to the truth. dam brethren of the Establishment is 2dly, The Established Church being now weak, such, that any recognition of brother is no longer regarded as an object of envy and

dread, whereas formerly it was ; the Free hood between a voluntary and a church-|

Church, on the other hand, being strong and man is regarded with an evil eye, and flourishing, is an object of bitter malice and any act of pulpit intercourse would be dislike to all those hollow professors of Chrisinterpreted by this class of Free Church tianity who feel themselves thereby thrown into

the shade." adherents as a declaration of war against them. One thing we readily admit, The Free Church Magazine is misthat voluntary churchmen are not dis- taken here in point of fact. Opposition posed to take up precisely the antago to the Establishment has not ceased on nist position towards the Establishment the part “ of many of our voluntaries. which the Free Church brethren de- The active agitation of the controversy is sire. We will not cut off co-operation more frequently suspended now than it with ministers and members of the Esta- was in former years; this we own; and blishment in benevolent and religious we are able to give our cotemporary very societies. In this we only adhere to a intelligible, if not satisfactory reasons, principle we have acted on all along, for the change. When the brethren even in the heat of the voluntary now composing the Free Church Ascontroversy, when the Free brethren sembly were members of the Establishbroke off from dissenters then, as they ment, they proved themselves both the would have dissenters to break off from ablest and the keenest opponents of churchmen now; and because we are so voluntaryism, and were continually prouncomplying as still to abide by our jecting schemes of aggression, with the principle, we are guilty, forsooth, of apparent purpose of extinguishing dis"fawning” on the Establishment.

sent, by bringing the national resources coOn the subject of pulpit intercourse, to bear upon this object. Their belliwe think both churchmen and Free gerent attempts were persevering, and churchmen labour under very ground- our defensive movements were equally less apprehensions. So concerned are protracted. But, on “the disruption" the venerable Assembly for the purity taking place, the voluntary controversy and honour of their pulpits, that they was viewed by its friends as having are at pains to guard them against a issued in a signal triumph, and a pause danger which, filled as those pulpits for ensued, as the natural result of victory. the most part are, we will take it upon Meanwhile, as the Establishment was us to say, the church will find to be seen to be prostrate in its moral weakvisionary. Our Free Church brethren, ness, the same cause and occasion ceased on the other hand, are equally unrea- to operate with equal force, as before, sonable in their resentments. The views to summon the friends of voluntaryism to of pulpit intercourse with other deno- active warfare. Besides--and we are minations, as at present held by dis- privy to the fact--there were those senters, are the same as formerly; they among “the many" who thought that are neither tightened nor widened in the unintermitted agitation of the quesconsideration of the Free Church; they tion might interfere with the good uncertainly were not learned from the derstanding-believed to be sincere Free Church; and are not likely to be which, to the delight of good men, had laid aside merely to do her a pleasure. arisen between Free Churchmen and In the mean time, we repel the charge their voluntary friends; and it was felt of “fawning and craving,” &c., as a to be desirable, so far as could be done gratuitous and spiteful calumny without compromise of principle, not

" Will any one of our readers,” proceeds unnecessarily to disturb this happy our cotemporary, "endeavour now to explain and harmonious state of things. We why, amidst this deep and growing degradation on the part of the Establishment, all the

acknowledge that, for our part, we opposition against it should have ceased on the part of so many of our voluntaries-why. they should have been so furious whilst the

hel we know-an influence diametrieally Establishment was comparatively pure-and, why, instead of continuing to assail it now, they opposed to the motive which our cotemshould still direct all their attacks against the porary, whose penetration and whose men who came out of it? It is a curious fact. eharity appear to be commensurate, has The reasons of it are, we think, twofold-Ist,

But The opposition, in both cases, has arisen, in a been pleased so freely to ascribe. great measure, from a deadly hatred of evan. in the midst of all these admissions of abatement in the controversy, we must One thing we thank him for--that since remind our cotemporary that voluntaries he was carrying in his breast so old and have not been silent, neither the “many" so envenomed a grudge, he has at length nor the few; of which, if he had been come fairly out with it. Henceforth looking about him, he would have had a there can be no mistakes, for we think we satisfactory proof in thọ general meeting can promise him, as heretofore, whether convened in Edinburgh, not very long in peace or in war, perfeot sincerity on ago, for the special and avowed purpose the other side. of maintaining the voluntary banner un- Of a piece with this is a second reason furled. At this meeting a central exe- assigned for alleged suspension of hosticutive organ was remodelled, whioh we lities against the Establishment,—that doubt not will, on all fitting occasions, the Free Church, being strong and floumake its voice to be heard and its influ- rishing, is now the object of “ malice and ence felt, unswayed alike by squeangish dislike." Thus the Free Church organ delicacy for the scruples of Free Church sees nothing in the voluntary controvermen, and by relentings towards the Na- sy but animosity from the first :-voluntional Church, which, whether weak or taryism attacked the Established Church strong, cannot, as an established church, because an object of envy ; voluntaryism be regarded by the supporters of the is now the enemy of the Free Church, voluntary principle as an object either because its glory throws others into the of connivance or of sympathy.

shade. We wish this judge of others Our cotemporary has a theory of his were more concerned to know the spirit own on this part of the case. The that is in him. alleged supineness of the “ many volun- One thing it is high time we were taries” in their opposition to the Estab- assured of is, how far the spirit of the arlishment is, it seems, attributable to “a ticle we are remarking on may be condeadly hatred of evangelical religion "sidered as indicating the animus of his on the part of the “many,” that is, the brethren-whether our monitor is some body of dissentors by whom the volun- peevish partisan, overtaken in a testy tary warfare was wont to be waged, and mood, and indulging himself in a diet of these are here classified as “hypocritical scolding; or whether, in the sentiments professors and open infidels," This, a expressed, the Free Church Magazine is few years ago, was with certain parties the bona fide organ of the body whose the favourite style in conducting contro- name it bears. If the jealousy, preversy. We had thought that even the sumption, and alienation, which it so most rabid zealots had become ashamed strongly displays, pervade the body to of it. We see our mistake; but we are any extent; if it be shared, which we not careful to answer in this matter. firmly believe it is not, by the leading Mercifully it is not at the bar of our men of the denomination, then, we would cotemporary, nor at any such tribunal, say, let there be no reserve; let there be that we are called to stand. This, how no putting on, and no keeping up, of ever, we will say, thąt if such have been plausible appearances ; — and, on the his private sentiments respecting the other hand, if there be, as we trust “many” supporters of the voluntary prin- there is, a sound basis of mutual respect ciple, we know no profession more "hol- and goodwill, let no wanton assail. low” and more meaningless than to talk ant be tolerated in raking up his hack. of co-operation, or of evangelical alli- neyed ribaldry, and making our profesances with such men, or in any circum- sions of brotherhood a matter of bur. stances to acknowledge them as brethren, / lesque,

XURRAY AND GIBB, PRINTERS, EDINBURGE.

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A Aberdeen, Rev. Henry Angus, Aberdeen,
Arb --Arbroath, Joseph Hay, Arbroath, ...
Car +Carlisle, Rev. Geo. Clark, Chapelknow, Cannonbie,
Col +Coldstream, John Peden, Berwick, . .. :
Cup -Cupar, John Rankine, Cupar-Fife,....
Dfs -Dumfries,

William Rogerson, Thornhill.
D -Dundee, John Muir, Newtyle, Cupar Angus,
Dne-Dunfermline, John More, Cairney-hill, Dunfermline, .
Ed-Edinburgh, J. Smart, Smith's Pl., Leith Walk, Edin.,
El, -Elgin,

Adam Lind, Elgin, ..'.
G -Glasgow, George Jeffrey, Whitevale, Glasgow, ..
K -Kilmarnock, David Ronald, Saltcoats, .

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Kr-Kirkaldy, John Johnston, Leslie, Markinch, ..
L Lanark, James Barrie, Carnwath, Lanark, . .
Ls -Lancashire, Wm. Reid Thorburn, Hallfold, Rochdale,
Lon-London,

R. Redpath, Camden-Town, London,
N -Newcastle, James Pringle, Newcastle, . .. : .
0 _Orkney,

Robert Paterson, Kirkwall,
Pa Paisley,

William France, Paisley, .. .
P -Perth,

John Lamb, Errol,
Sk ---Selkirk, Thomas Williamson, Melrose,
S —Stewartfield, Robert Campbell, Peterhead,
St - Stirling, James Gilfillan, Stirling,..
W – Wigtown, William Smellie, Stranraer,
Lis - Lismore,
Por – Portree,
Sto -Stornoway,

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John Irvine,
John C. Jackson,
George Jardine,
John Kidd,

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John Robertson,
John Scott, Sen.
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William Stewart,

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Correspondence respecting Appointments during these six months, to be with Mr RONALD.
Figures mark the number of Sabbaths; Roman characters mark ordinary demands; others Missionary.

Engagements of Preachers by Presbyteries or Ministers, will stand only if notified to the Committee of Distribution. Presbytery Clerks are required to intimate to this Committee the licences of Preachers.

The Synod recommend to Preachers to take into serious consideration the calls which, in providence, are addressed to them to engage in missionary labour, either by going abroad, or by accepting an appointment to a home station, for a period of not less than twelve or six months :-Preachers inclined to be thus employed, or who desire farther information on the subject, to correspond with the Rev. ANDREW SOMERVILLE, Edinburgh.

Probationers are enjoined by the Synod, to send their addresses, during their vacant time, to the Clerks of the Presbyteries in which their appointments end, and also to the Committee of Distribution.

The Synod has appointed a standing Committee, distinct from the Committee of Distribution, to whom all complaints, either by Congregations or Preachers, or others, in reference to appointments, or not fulálling appointments, shall be made. This Committee has the power of corresponding with the Preachers :-all complaints or matters brought before them, which they cannot adjust or remedy, they shall lay before the Synod; it being understood, that this shall not interfere with the rights of Presbyteries. - Rev. Dr. PEDDIE, Edinburgh, Convener.

Preachers in Missionary Stations are required to report, at least once in three months, both to the Rev. ANDREW SOMERVILLE, Edinburgh, and to the Presbytery in which they officiate.

Presbytery Clerks are requested to have all demands for next Scheme forwarded to Saltcoats not later than the Ist of December.

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