A Treatise on Heraldry, British and Foreign: With English and French Glossaries, Volume 2

Front Cover
W. & A. K. Johnston, 1892 - Devices (Heraldry). - 858 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 750 - Know Ye .that We of our princely grace and special favour, have given and granted and by these Presents do give and grant unto him the said...
Page 750 - SPEKE, Esquire, Captain in our Indian Military Forces, in connection with the discovery of the sources of the Nile, and who was, by a deplorable accident, suddenly deprived of his life before he had received any mark of our Royal favour ; and being desirous of preserving in his family the remembrance of these services by the grant of certain honourable armorial distinctions to his family arms : — Know ye that we, of our...
Page 534 - In his own country the king granted these honourable augmentations to his armorial ensign : a chief undulated, argent; thereon waves of the sea; from which a palm tree issuant, between a disabled ship on the dexter, and a ruinous battery on the sinister, all proper...
Page 750 - ... des armes de celuy qui le portera, et sur le dit lambrequin au plus haut du sommet, sera assis le dit Tymbre, et autour d'iceluy aura vn tortil des couleurs que voudra le Tournoyeur. " Item, et quand tous les heaulmes seront ainsi mis et ordonnez pour les departir, viendront toutes Dames et...
Page 398 - He was twentieth in descent from Geoffrey Lord Saye, who was one of the twenty-five barons appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Charta. The family, paternally of Yorkshire origin, is descended from John Twisleton, of Barley, Yorkshire, who married the Hon.
Page 627 - SUPPORTERS are figures of living creatures placed at the side, or sides, of an armorial shield, and appearing to support it. French writers make a distinction, giving the name of Supports to animals, real or imaginary, thus employed ; while human figures or angels similarly used are called Tenants.
Page 652 - ... qui y appartiennent. Et s'il les a, il doit à la première bataille , où il se trouvera , apporter un pennon de ses armes, et doit venir au...
Page 604 - ... their Coats of Arms in the British dominions. But this was not always the case in Germany; for some of the great ecclesiastics, archbishops, bishops, abbots, and even others held their fiefs direct from the emperor, and as such were liable to feudal military service. Spener, the great German herald, says that in Germany, at any rate, universal custom is opposed to the omission of the crest, and ecclesiastics retained the full knightly insignia. On the other hand, in the southern kingdoms, clerics...
Page 652 - ... il doit, à la première bataille où il se trouvera, apporter un pennon de ses armes et doit venir au connétable, ou aux...
Page 628 - The old romances give us evidence that this custom prevailed ; but I think only after the use of supporters had already arisen from another source. "There is really little doubt now that Anstis was quite correct when, in his Aspilogia, he attributed the origin of supporters to the invention of the engraver, who filled up the spaces at the top and sides of the triangular shield upon a circular seal with foliage, or with fanciful animals. Any good collection of mediaeval seals will strengthen this...

Bibliographic information