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ΥΠΕΡΙΔΟΥ ΛΟΓΟΣ ΕΠΙΤΑΦΙΟΣ.

THE FUNERAL ORATION OF HYPERIDES OVER LEOSTHENES AND HIS COMRADES IN

THE LAMIAN WAR.

Cambridge:

PRINTED BY C. J. CLAY, M. A.

AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

THE FUNERAL ORATION OF HYPERIDES OVER
LEOSTHENES AND HIS COMRADES IN

THE LAMIAN WAR.

THE TEXT EDITED WITH NOTES AND AN INTRODUCTION

By CHURCHILL BABINGTON, B.D. F.L.S.

FELLOW OF ST JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, MEMBER OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LITERATURE,
HONORARY MEMBER OF THE HISTORICO-THEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LEIPSIC, MEMBER
OF THE NUMISMATIC SOCIETY, EDITOR OF THE ORATIONS OF HYPERIDES FOR
LYCOPHRON, FOR EUXENIPPUS, AND AGAINST DEMOSTHENES, ETC.

Hyperidis oratio funebris cum ceteris viri facundissimi scriptis diu multumque
desideratur. Tour. ad Longin. § 34.

Hæc oratio apud veteres clarissima fuit. SAUPP. Fragm. Oratt. Att. p. 292.

THE SECOND EDITION, CORRECTED.

CAMBRIDGE: DEIGHTON, BELL, AND CO.
LONDON: BELL AND DALDY.

1859.

290.4.47.

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TH

HE Papyrus, on which the Funeral Oration of Hyperides is written, was found in the neighbourhood of Egyptian Thebes, and was brought to England about the end of 1856 by the Rev. H. Stobart, M.A. It is now in the British Museum (Papyri, No. XCVIII). A full account of it may be seen in my large edition, which contains likewise an engraved facsimile of the whole'. The characters and marks used in the MS. (much resembling the Herculanensian Papyri) appear to indicate that it is at least as old as the second century after Christ. Two other Greek hands on the back of the papyrus lead to the same conclusion.

It is reasonable to suppose that it contains the greater part of the speech, which is alike valuable in a historical point of view, and as being one of the most celebrated, if not the most celebrated of all the oratorical efforts of the author. Its genuineness is proved by the quotations made from it by the grammarians. (See Cols. 8 and 10 of the papyrus.) At the same time it is fortunate that the long and magnificent passage of this speech, preserved by Stobæus, is among the missing portions of the papyrus. It is evident that it formed the epilogue or a great part of it, whereas the fragments of the papyrus appear to begin at the commencement of the oration, and to go forwards, with two or three slight interruptions, as far as fourteen columns: so that

'It must be sufficient to say here that the MS. was broken up into many pieces, which after transcribing. I was able to arrange or unite (one excepted, containing only a few letters): Columns 3-12 are undoubtedly continuous: columns 13, 14 form one piece, which probably immediately followed them. Columns 1 and 2 (now in separate pieces) in all likelihood were the first two columns of the MS.

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