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rank. . . . Sonnet xxxIII. is conclusive, even if we did not know Shakspere's love of the pun or play on a

word :

Even so, my Sun one early morn did shine
With all triumphant splendour on my brow.1

E. STENGEL.

[Bilden die Ersten 126 Sonette Shakespcre’s einen Sonettcyclus, und

welche ist die ursprüngliche Reihenfolge derselben ? Englische

Studien. 34 pp. 1881.] They were modelled after Daniel's Sonnets; were written after Venus and Adonis and perhaps before Lucrece, for the Earl of Southampton, in the fashion of the time, to amuse him and his young friends. The true order of 1.cxxvi. is the following: xxvi. (dedication), I., IV., VIII., VII., XI., III., V., VI., II., IX., X., XII., XX., XIV., XIII., XV., XVI., XVII., LIX., CVI., LIII., CV., LIV., CIV., LXXXI., LV., LXIV., XIX., LXIII., LXV., LX., CVII., XVIII., CXXVI., CVIII., LXXVII., CXXII., C., CI., XXXVIII., XXIII., LXXIII., LXXIV., XXXII., XXXIX., LXXVIII., LXXIX., LXXXII., XXI., LXXVI., CIII., LXXXIII., LXXXV., LXXX., LXXXVI., LXXI., LXXII., CII., LXXXIV., LVIII., LVII., LXVII., LXVIII., CXXIII., LXVI., CXVI., CXV., CXXIV., XXV., XXIX., XXX., XXXI., XXXVII., CXXV., XCI., XCII., XCIII., XCIV., LXIX., LXX., XXXIII., XXXIV., XXXV., XCV., XCVI., XL., XLI., XLII., XXXVI., LXXXVII., L., LI., XXVII., XXVIII., XLIII., LXI., LXII., XXII., XXIV., XLVI., XLVII., XLIV., XLV., XCVII., XCVIII., XCIX., XLVIII. (perhaps

F. J. Furnivall, The Academy, Aug. 27, 1881.

XLIX., LXXXVIII.-XC. better before LXXXVII.), XLIX., LXXXVIII., LXXXIX., XC., CIX., CXVII., CXXI., CXI., CXII., LXXV., LII., CXIII., CXIV., CXVIII., CXIX., CXX., LVI.

An analysis of each Sonnet is given, and an appendix is added—I. Sonnets 34–40 of Daniel's Delia ; II. Cynthia, with certain Sonnets, etc. 1595. Sonnets 1–20.

FRITZ KRAUSS.

[Die schwarze Schöne der Shakespeare-Sonette: Jahrbuch der Shake

speare Gesellschaft, Bd. xvi. pp. 141-212. 1881.]

Supports and developes Gerald Massey's theory as modified in his edition of 1872. What is of most value in Krauss's article is a striking series of parallel passages from Sidney and others illustrating the Sonnets.

RICHARD HENRY STODDARD.

[The Sonnet in English Poetry. Scribner's Monthly. October, 1881.] |

Agrees with Dyce that “the greater number of the Sonnets were composed in an assumed character, and at different times, for the amusement and probably at the suggestion of the author's intimate associates.” To the two Sonnets pointed out by Dyce as having an individual application to Shakspere (cx. and cxi.), Mr. Stoddard adds LXXI. and LXXIII. “The Sonnets of Shakspere extend over a considerable period, but most of them were

1 Herr Krauss refers to an article by him on the Sonnets which I have not seen. “Nord und Sud,” Feb. 1879.

written, I think, in his early manhood. The conceits with which they abound, and a certain crude richness of diction, wherein maturity and immaturity struggle for mastery, determine their date.”

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MRS. C. F. ASHMEAD WINDLE.

[Address to the New Shakspere Society of London. Discovery of Lord

Verulam's Undoubted Authorship of the “Shakspere.” Works. San
Francisco, 1881.]

In the “Shakspere" plays, Bacon expresses an ENIGMA under a VEILED ALLEGORY. The key to the running allegory is contained in the mystery of the Sonnets. An “absolute divineness of ideality underlies their mere outward form, as well as a plaintive autobiographical information of the poet's consciousness.” Mrs. Windle illustrates her discovery by the play of Cymbeline, where Posthumu symbolizes the posthumous fame of Bacon, Cloten (clothing) his living bodily personality, and Morgan (my organ) the Novum Organum. Posthumus is the son of Sicilius : now the sonnet-form is of Sicilian origin. Sicilius therefore signifies the poetic genius invoked in the sonnets of Bacon as a “lovely boy,” and besought to beget “copies” of itself, which should gain an enduring fame. Hence Posthumus represents the posthumous fame promised in the Sonnets. Tenantius, by whom Sicilius “had his titles” of beauty, grace, and honour, was the writer or dweller in the Sonnets, who gained the sur-addition Leonatus, and he, of course, signifies the author of the dramas, Francis Bacon. “I feel,” writes Mrs. Windle, " that my penetration into, and unfolding of the inmost mind and heart of these plays, is a realization of the deepest reach of sympathetic intuition of which the human intellect and soul are capable only short of that attained by the immortal dramatist himself.”

SONNETS. 66

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