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OF

OLDEN TIME,

CONCERNING

THE EARLY SETTLEMENT AND PROGRESS

OF

Philadelphia and Yennsylvania.

FOR THE USE OF FAMILIES AND SCHOOLS.

ILLUSTRATED WITH PLATES.

arrum ,

BY JOHN F. WATSON,
AUTHOR OF ANNALS OF PHILADELPHIA, &c. &c.

"Oh! dear is a tale of the olden time."

PHILADELPHIA:

PUBLISHED BY E. LITTELL AND BY THOMAS HOLDEN.

158.4 .W 34

ENTERED, according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1833, by E. LIT. TELL and by THOMAS HOLDEN, in the clerk's office of the district for the eastern district of Pennsylvania.

Csigt 1-206-29

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The first contemplations and feelings of youth should be drawn out and fixed upon country and home. These strongest natural affections of the heart-soonest and readiest possessed, and longest and most fondly retained-should be sedulously cherished concerning the land of our birth. To this end, whatever can multiply those local associations of idea which bind us to the paternal soil, must benefit the youth, and at the same time win the countenance and support of judicious parents and guardians. “Such topics," says Washington Irving, “call up scenes and affections which nothing can efface from the heart."

There is a natural and useful curiosity, in all, to know

the cause and origin of things around them. This passion is peculiarly strong in youthful minds; and what can be more worthy of their inquiry and interest, than the first settlement and progress of their forefathers, through many early difficulties, to civilisation, refinement and happiness? Wherefore, few things can be proposed so pleasingly instructive, and so stirring to the feelings, as to learn those striking incidents of the olden time, which seize upon the mind like visions of fancy, or dreams of the imagination. It may, in fine, be said, that it is the duty of patriotism, as well as of parental affection, that " when your children shall ask you wherefore are these things so? then shall ye answer them, fc.” “ It is thus,” says the Association of Teachers in Philadelphia, upon this subject, “ that the good taste of our youth will be cultivated, as effectually as their curiosity will be gratified, and at the same time the cause of popular instruction will receive a valuable impulse.”

The following illustrations of the proper domestic history of Philadelphia, and of the early rise and progress of Pennsylvania, from its small beginnings to its present greatness-derived in substance from “ Watson's Annals of Philadelphia,”—are cast together in the form of instructive historical tales, with a hope that they may succeed to inform the minds and improve the hearts of the youths of our country.' “ By the preser

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