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MUSICAL GEMS
POR SCHOOL, AND HOME

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COLLECTION OF MUSIC FOR THE YOUN

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NEW YORK:
PUBLISHED BY NEWMAN & IVISON, 199 BROADWAY.
BOSTON-J. P. JEWETT & CO., & B. B. MUSSEY & CO. AUBURN-J. C. IVISON & CO. DETROIT-A. MOFARREN.
CHICAGO—S. C. GRIGGS & CO. CINCINNATI-WM. H. MOORE & CO., & G. L. WEED. PHILADELPHIA-AM. S. S.
UNION. J. C. MEEKS, A M. S. S. UNION, NEW YORK. ALBANY-E. H. PEASE & CO.

1852

latered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1849, by WILLIAM B, BRADBURY, in the Clerk's Office for the Southern District of New York.

A CARD. : undersigned would respectfully announce to the In the announcement of forthcoming new puberions rs of Choirs, to singers, and to the lovers of good such as it his intention to issue, as also in his future Lec generally, that in order more fully to carry out his tures or Instructions to Teachers, the undersignel is cons for the extensive diffusion of musical knowledge, scious of aiming at these elevated ends of music, and e general cultivation of the art throughout this coun- therefore counts on the approbation of all who desire to · has recently spent some two years in those parts see our schools of learning, our social circles, our churches, rope where Music receives the greatest attention, and our hearts, pervaded by her benign influence. Next institutes a part of the national system of education to religion, he believes, nothing can more contribute to the

this period, he has devoted himself assiduously to happiness, unity, and general well-being of our nation, than to the examination of the practical working of sys- a practical knowledge and genuine love of Music. And f instruction in the schools, to composition, and the how can this knowledge be disseminated, or taste cultivaon of materials for future use. His library is ex- ted, except by oral instruction, and the frequent publica, embracing the principal works of ancient and tion of new and interesting musical matter of an elevated n composers, both sacred and secular, and has been character, such as, while it attracts the attention and gratd with particular reference to the growing wants ifies the musical sensibilities, at the same time improves e true and highest musical interests of our country: the understanding, and makes the heart better. mission of Music in this land ought to be that of

WILLIAM B. BRADBURY. hest style of philanthropy. First of all, she should

P. S.-In answer to inquiries from abroad, Mr. BRADBURY would handmaid of Religion, the teacher of truth, and the state that he will lecture upon Music

, give instruction to large classes, of devotion. Then, in the walks of domestic and Teachers' Institutes, or Musical Conventions, and attend Concerts in ife, she should be the nurse of all gentle and pacific

, notice from authorized persons.

towns or cities not too remote from New York, upon receiving timely as of all patriotic sentiments. And it is with a faith that the power of music may thus become an

Will shortly be published : ource of natiONAL ELEVATION, that the undersigned BRADBURY'S SABBATH SCHOOL MELOhimself and the ample means at his command, to

DIES: A complete singing-book for all Sabbath School occathese higher ends of the art, to realize, if possible, sions. By William B. BRADBURY. able an object.

THE ALPINE GLEE SINGER: See cover.

19 od by THOMAS B. SMITH 216 William Street, New York.

Printed by J. D. BEDFORD, 59 Ann street, New York.

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Tappan Presb. Assre. 12-28-1932

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Murte 12-10-65

PREFACE

The present work is but the response to a call for more new music | Songs,” Alpine“ RANZ DES VACHES,” &c., &c. These selections h for the young. It is, however, no hasty production, but was com- been made from a musical mine almost exhaustless. They have b menced and continued up to a considerable point of progress during made, however, with the utmost care and discrimination, and w the Author's late residence in Germany.

they are by their native simplicity and attractiveness well calcula The musical art has during late years made in this country consid- to become favorites with the people, they are, at the same time, erable progress, and hence has arisen the necessity of frequent pub- mirably fitted by their peculiar style to refine and elevate the pop lication of new and interesting musical matter. The position which taste. music, as one of the liberal arts, was certainly destined here ultimately This we deem a point of the greatest moment. Music is an ag to assume—its availability as a source of refined entertainment, and confessedly potent either for good or evil; and he, therefore, i z's power as a medium of sacred sentiment and reverential praise- makes music-books for the masses, assumes a position of responsib formed the motive which in 1847 led the author of the “MUSICAL not a little important. He is answerable to a tribunal where tl Gems" away from his native land, directed his steps toward the great can be neither concealment nor mistake, and where whatever he] musical institutions of Europe, and made him take up a residence for forth will be estimated according to a standard that marks with about two years in Germany, there more thoroughly to qualify him- erring accuracy the difference between what refines and chastens, self for usefulness as an American Teacher, Author, and Compiler. what makes coarse and vulgar. The author certainly indulges

The time spent abroad was assiduously occupied in observing and hope derived from long experience both in teaching and publis! examining the results of popular methods of teaching, and receiving music, that this work will not be found deficient in this impor daily instructions and suggestions from the most eminent living teach- regard. ers of the Continent. He now returns to his country with a well- 3d. In the poetry associated with these “MUSICAL GEMS,” wil grounded confidence, he believes, in his ability to instruct others, and found a richness of sentiment and a high moral bearing which car to prepare suitable text-books for the use of those engaged either in fail to secure the approbation of all right-thinking minds. For teaching or in studying music.

happy execution of much of this part of the work we are indebte In regard to the present work, “Musical Gems,” several leading the ladies; the greater part of the original pieces being emanat features may here be noted.

from the clear heads and pure hearts of American female poets. 1st. It contains a most thorough, and yet a most clear, simple, and 4th. The work also contains a choice collection of metrical tu naturally progressive mode of teaching the elements of music reading and other sacred pieces, chiefly taken from the “ Mendelssohn Col -a mode by the adoption of which, we may confidently affirm that no tion of Church Music,” recently published. teacher possessing an ordinary amount of tact and ability, can possi- We add but a single remark; and that is, if the success of the l bly fail of success.

prove at all commensurate with the care and labor that have t 2d. It embraces a great variety of styles, and a large number of most expended upon it, it must have a popularity altogether beyond pleasing melodies, such as have long been and still are exceedingly ordinary loc of musical publications. popular in Germany and Switzerland as "People's" or "Student's NEW YORK, Dec., 1849.

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