Tales of Fashionable Life, Volume 1

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J. Johnson, 1809 - Electronic books - 400 pages
Maria Edgeworth's?Tales of?Fashionable Life?is noted for its telling and accurate?representations of life in Ireland. Edgeworth used her writing as a platform to?advocate for her politics. She was especially interested in the relationships?between aristocrats and their tenants. The first volume of?Tales of Fashionable Life?contains the novel?Ennui.?
 

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Page 253 - Now my weary lips I close: Leave me, leave me to repose.
Page 176 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide ; To lose good days that might be better spent ; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope ; to pine with fear and sorrow ; To have thy Prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Page 176 - To have thy asking, yet wait many years; To fret thy soul with crosses and with cares ; To eat thy heart through comfortless despairs; To fawn, to crouch, to wait, to ride, to run, To spend, to give, to want, to be undone.
Page 195 - ... ignorance is admirably painted from the life. It is really worth your while, my lord, to look at it. There's the book on that little table ; here is the passage. You see, this duchesse de la Ferte is showing off to a sister-duchess a poor girl of genius, like a puppet or an ape.
Page 243 - Cut off, and for the book of knowledge fair, Presented with an universal blank Of Nature's works, to me expunged and rased, And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.
Page 69 - Without uttering a syllable, they drove on : but they could not, nor could I, refrain from looking back to see how those fellows would manage. We saw the fore-horses make towards the right, then to the left, and every way but...
Page 133 - Irish. I did not recollect, perhaps at that time I did not know, that even in the days of the great Queen Elizabeth, "the greatest part of the buildings in the cities and good towns of England consisted only of timber, cast over with thick clay to keep out the wind. The new houses of the nobility were indeed either of brick or stone; and glass windows were then beginning to be used in England:" 11 and clean rushes were strewed over the dirty floors of the royal palace.
Page v - My daughter asks me for a Preface to the following volumes; from a pardonable weakness she calls upon me for parental protection: but, in fact, the public judges of every work, not from the sex, but from the merit of the author. What we feel, and see, and hear, and read, affects our conduct from the moment when we begin, till the moment when we cease to think. It has therefore been my daughter's aim to promote, by all her writings, the progress of education from the cradle to the grave.
Page 73 - I'm too cute for him yet. See there, now, he's come to; and I'll be his bail he'll go asy enough wid me. Ogh! he has a fine spirit of his own, but it's I that can match him: 'twould be a poor case if a man like me cou'dn't match a horse any way, let alone a mare, which this is, or it never would be so vicious.
Page 39 - And the reason is because in the opinion of this people fostering hath always been a stronger alliance than blood, and the foster-children do love and are beloved of their foster-fathers and their sept more than of their own natural parents and kindred, and do participate of their means more frankly, and do adhere unto them in all fortunes with more affection and constancy.

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