The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved Text of Edmund Malone, Including the Latest Revisions, : with a Life, Glossarial Notes, an Index, and One Hundred and Seventy Illustrations, from Designs by English Artists, Volume 12

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Henry G. Bohn, 1844
 

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Page 269 - Fear no more the frown o' the great: Thou art past the tyrant's stroke. Care no more to clothe and eat; To thee the reed is as the oak: The sceptre, learning, physic, must All follow this, and come to dust.
Page 44 - So many mermaids, tended her i' the eyes, And made their bends adornings : at the helm A seeming mermaid steers : the silken tackle Swell with the touches of those flower-soft hands, That yarely frame the office. From the barge A strange invisible perfume hits the sense Of the adjacent wharfs. The city cast Her people out upon her ; and Antony, Enthroned i...
Page 206 - Hark, hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings, And Phoebus 'gins arise, His steeds to water at those springs On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin To ope their golden eyes: With every thing that pretty is, My lady sweet, arise: Arise, arise.
Page 45 - I saw her once Hop forty paces through the public street : And having lost her breath, she spoke, and panted> That she did make defect, perfection, And, breathless, power breathe forth. Mec. Now Antony must leave her utterly. Eno. Never ; he will not ; Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale Her infinite variety : Other women Cloy th' appetites they feed ; but she makes hungry, Where most she satisfies.
Page 62 - By certain scales i' the pyramid; they know, By the height, the lowness, or the mean, if dearth Or foison follow. The higher Nilus swells, The more it promises; as it ebbs, the seedsman Upon the slime and ooze scatters his grain, And shortly comes to harvest. LEP. You've strange serpents there. ANT. Ay, Lepidus. LEP. Your serpent of Egypt is bred now of your mud by the operation of your sun. So is your crocodile.
Page 318 - To fair Fidele's grassy tomb Soft maids and village hinds shall bring Each opening sweet of earliest bloom, And rifle all the breathing spring. No wailing ghost shall dare appear To vex with shrieks this quiet grove: But shepherd lads assemble here, And melting virgins own their love. No withered witch shall here be seen, No goblins lead their nightly crew; The female fays shall haunt the green, And dress thy grave with pearly dew!
Page 269 - FEAR no more the heat o' the sun, Nor the furious winter's rages; Thou thy worldly task hast done, Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages. Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust. Fear no more the frown o...
Page 267 - O bill! sore-shaming Those rich-left heirs that let their fathers lie Without a monument, bring thee all this; Yea, and furr'd moss besides, when flowers are none, To winter-ground thy corse.
Page 126 - That, which is now a horse, even with a thought; The rack * dislimns ; and makes it indistinct, As water is in water. Eros. It does, my lord. Ant. My good knave, Eros, now thy captain is Even such a body : here I am Antony ; Yet cannot hold this visible shape.
Page 145 - His legs bestrid the ocean; his rear'd arm Crested the world; his voice was propertied As all the tuned spheres, and that to friends; But when he meant to quail and shake the orb, He was as rattling thunder: For his bounty, There was no winter in't; an autumn 'twas That grew the more by reaping. His delights Were dolphin-like; they show'd his back above The element they lived in. In his livery Walk'd crowns and crownets; realms and islands were As plates dropp'd from his pocket.

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