The Saturday Magazine, Volume 2

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John William Parker, 1833 - Periodicals
 

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Page 45 - I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow : when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
Page 238 - Of mimic statesmen, and their merry king. No wit to flatter, left of all his store! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame, this lord of useless thousands ends!
Page 144 - They that deny a God destroy man's nobility; for certainly man is of kin to the beasts by his body ; and, if he be not of kin to God by his spirit, he is a base and ignoble creature.
Page 176 - The old man told him that he worshipped the fire only, and acknowledged no other God ; at which answer Abraham grew so zealously angry, that he thrust the old man out of his tent, and exposed him to all the evils of the night and an unguarded condition. When the old man was gone, God called to Abraham, and asked him where the stranger was? He replied, I thrust him away because he did not worship thee...
Page 198 - Oh! Call my brother back to me, I cannot play alone; The summer comes with flower and bee — Where is my brother gone? The butterfly is glancing bright Across the sunbeam's track; I care not now to chase its flight— Oh! Call my brother back. The flowers run wild— the flowers we sowed Around our garden tree; Our vine is drooping with its load — Oh! Call him back to me.
Page 135 - Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us : therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness ; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
Page 144 - For take an example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on when he finds himself maintained by a man, who to him is instead of a God, or melior natura, which courage is manifestly such as that creature, without that confidence, of a better nature than his own could never attain. So man, when he resteth and assureth himself upon divine protection and favor, gathereth a force and faith which human nature in itself could not obtain.
Page 2 - And I will harden Pharaoh's heart, that he shall follow after them ; and I will be honoured upon Pharaoh, and upon all his host ; that the Egyptians may know that I am the Lord.
Page 108 - ... with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his strength ; and therefore, they loved him as truly and as fervently as he loved England.
Page 103 - I shall never again be capable of entering into such scenes. Indeed, I am altogether unconcerned at the thoughts of this life. I foresee that poverty and obscurity probably await me, and I am in some measure prepared, and daily preparing to meet them. I have but just time and paper to return you my grateful thanks for the lessons of virtue and piety you have given me, which were too much neglected at the time of giving them, but which I hope have been remembered ere it is yet too late.

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