THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF LORD MACAULAY

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Page 355 - Council is of opinion that the great object of the British Government ought to be the promotion of European literature and science among the natives of India; and that all the funds appropriated for the purpose of education would be best employed on English education alone.
Page 333 - I determined to know nothing among you save Jesus Christ, and -him crucified.
Page 65 - MY mind to me a kingdom is ; Such perfect joy therein I find As far exceeds all earthly bliss That God or nature hath assigned ; Though much I want that most would have, Yet still my mind forbids to crave.
Page 173 - ... walked down to the Thames, took a boat and rowed to Billingsgate. Beauclerk and Johnson were so well pleased with their amusement, that they resolved to persevere in dissipation for the rest of the day : but Langton deserted them, being engaged to breakfast with some young Ladies. Johnson scolded him for " leaving his social friends, to go and sit with a set of wretched un-idea'd girls." Garrick being told of this ramble, said to him smartly, " I heard of your frolick t'other night. You'll be...
Page 334 - with me : and, as soon as they began to read, the whole station was in a passion of excitement about Miss Harlowe and her misfortunes, and her scoundrelly Lovelace ! The Governor's wife seized the book, and the Secretary waited for it, and the Chief Justice could not read it for tears...
Page 354 - ... whether, when we can teach European science, we shall teaoh systems which, by universal confession, whenever they differ from those of Europe, differ for the worse ; and whether, when we can patronize sound philosophy and true history, we shall countenance, at the public expense, medical doctrines which would disgrace an English farrier — astronomy which would move laughter in...
Page 50 - Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings ; he shall not stand before mean men...
Page 355 - ... a learned native," when he has mastered all these points of knowledge : but by teaching him those foreign languages in which the greatest mass of information had been laid up, and thus putting all that information within his reach. The languages of Western Europe civilized Russia. I cannot doubt that they will do for the Hindoo what they have done for the Tartar.
Page 354 - Western nations at the close of the fifteenth and the beginning of the sixteenth century.
Page 116 - The effect on the author's reputation was instantaneous. Like Lord Byron, he awoke one morning and found himself famous. The beauties of the work were such as all men could recognise, and its very faults pleased, . . , The family breakfasttable in Bloomsbury was covered with cards of invitation to dinner from every quarter of London.

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