Historical Memoirs of the English, Irish, and Scottish Catholics: Since the Reformation ...

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Page 463 - Render therefore to all their dues: tribute to whom tribute is due; custom to whom custom; fear to whom fear; honour to whom honour. Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.
Page 298 - God's Word, or of the Sacraments, the which thing the Injunctions also lately set forth by Elizabeth our Queen do most plainly testify; but that only prerogative, which we see to have been given always to all godly Princes in holy Scriptures by God himself...
Page 21 - Concerning appeals, if they should occur, they ought to proceed from the archdeacon to the bishop, from the bishop to the archbishop. And if the archbishop should...
Page 298 - Majesty the chief government, by which Titles we understand the minds of some slanderous folks to be offended ; we give not to our Princes the ministering either of God's Word, or of the Sacraments...
Page 403 - Justice is usually printed, a Declaration of the favourable dealing of her majesty's commissioners, appointed for the examination of certayne traitours; and of tortures unjustly reported to be done upon them for matters of religion.
Page 230 - ... office of supreme head of the church of England. How benignly his grace essayed to convert the miserable man ; how strong and manifest reasons his highness alleged against him. I wish the princes and potentates of Christendom to have had a meet place to have seen it. Undoubtedly they should have much marvelled at his majesty's most high wisdom and judgment, and reputed him no otherwise after the same, than in a manner the mirror and light of all other kings and princes in Christendom.
Page 172 - I find his Grace my very good Lord indeed, and I believe he doth as singularly favour me as any subject within this realm ; howbeit, son Roper, I may tell thee, I have no cause to be proud thereof ; for if my head would win him a castle in France (for then there was war between us) it should not fail to go.
Page 210 - I know a merchant-man which shall at this time be nameless, that bought the contents of two noble libraries for forty shillings...
Page 61 - My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law of thy mother: For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thy head, and chains about thy neck.
Page 166 - I, AB, do utterly testify and declare in my conscience, that the queen's highness is the only supreme governor of this realm, and of all other her highness's dominions and countries, as well in all spiritual or ecclesiastical things or causes, as temporal...