Olive Thomas: The Life and Death of a Silent Film Beauty

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McFarland, Nov 29, 2014 - Performing Arts - 212 pages
4 Reviews
Olive Thomas was one of Hollywood’s first true movie stars. Born in Charleroi, Pennsylvania, in 1894, she moved to New York at age sixteen and began to pursue an acting career. By 1915, she had landed a job as one of Ziegfeld’s famous “Follies” girls. Before long her beauty was discovered by Hollywood, where she quickly became one of the biggest names in motion pictures. Her marriage to film star Jack Pickford further enhanced her popularity. Olive’s death by poison on September 10, 1920, created a media circus. This biography begins with Olive’s birth, follows her trip to stardom, and covers in detail the circumstances surrounding her mysterious death at age 25. Rare and beautiful photographs and a complete filmography are included.
 

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User Review  - CindyBytes - LibraryThing

Large portions of this book are reprints of interviews and articles from Hollywood magazines to newspapers that date back to the early 1920s. Anyone knows periodicals of that era generally were not ... Read full review

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User Review  - knahs - LibraryThing

A most amazing bio of silent film star Olive Thomas who is probably more well known today from her tragic death by drinking mercury (accidentally, on-purpose, or forced). All three reasons are ... Read full review

Contents

RAGS TO RICHES
13
FOLLIES AND FROLICS AND FILM OH MY
24
JACK AND OLLIE
35
SELZNICK PICTURES
48
PARIS
75
THE INVESTIGATION
91
WHAT JACK TOLD MARY
115
A BROKEN MAN AND HIS WOMEN
120
MEMORIES OF A LOST LOVE
128
GHOSTLY ENCOUNTERS
132
EPILOGUE
139
STAGE AND FILM APPEARANCES
145
BIBLIOGRAPHY
195
Index
199
Copyright

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Page 22 - make believe" is sad. Scores of comedians are not funny, hundreds of "America's most beautiful girls" are not gay. Our benefactor has passed away. He picked us from all walks of life. He led us into what little fame we achieved. He remained our friend regardless of our usefulness to him as an entertainer. He brought beauty into the entertainment world. The profession of acting must be necessary, for it exists in every race, and every language, and to have been the master amusement provider of your...
Page 11 - We feel a grave injustice has been done him. We feel also that it was only our plain duty to give him this exoneration, under the evidence, for there was not the slightest proof adduced to connect him in any way with the commission of a crime. He was manly throughout the case, and told a straightforward story on the witness stand, which we all believed. The happening at the hotel was an unfortunate affair for which Arbuckle, so the evidence shows, was in no way responsible.
Page 21 - I've had in my shows and that I paid a lot of money to and who made my customers shriek were not only not funny to me, but I couldn't understand why they were funny to anybody. You'd be surprised how many of my expensive comics I've run out on and locked myself in my office when they were onstage.

About the author (2014)

Film historian Michelle Vogel lives in Victoria, Australia. Her popular blog can be found at mvozus.wordpress.com.

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