An Introduction to the Study of Chemical Philosophy: Being a Preparatory View of the Forces which Concur to the Production of Chemical Phenomena

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John W. Parker, 1843 - Chemistry - 764 pages
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Page 9 - Matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable, moveable Particles, of such Sizes and Figures, and with such other Properties, and in such Proportion to Space, as most conduced to the End for which he form'd them...
Page 137 - ... passing from the solid to the liquid, and from the liquid to the gaseous form, or the contrary, occasioning endless vicissitudes of temperature over the globe.
Page 675 - In all chemical investigations. it has justly been considered an important object to ascertain the relative weights of the simples which constitute a compound. But unfortunately the enquiry has terminated here; whereas from the relative weights in the mass, the relative weights of the ultimate particles or atoms of the bodies...
Page 766 - James's Treatise on the Corruptions of Scripture, Councils, and Fathers, by the Prelates, Pastors, and Pillars of the Church of Rome.
Page 595 - The extraordinary noise caused by the horses' hoofs makes the fish issue from the mud, and excites them to combat. These yellowish and livid eels, resembling large aquatic serpents, swim on the surface of the water, and crowd under the bellies of the horses and mules. A contest between animals of so different an organization furnishes a very striking spectacle.
Page 9 - Particles, of such Sizes and Figures, and with such other Properties, and in such Proportion to Space, as most conduced to the End for which he formed them; and that these primitive Particles being Solids, are incomparably harder than any porous Bodies compounded of them; even so very hard, as never to wear or break in pieces; no ordinary Power being able to divide what God himself made in the first Creation.
Page 675 - When only one combination of two bodies can be obtained, it must be presumed to be a binary one, unless some cause appear to the contrary.
Page 39 - From the foregoing statements it may be safely inferred that " the mean height of the barometer at the level of the sea being the same in every part of the globe...
Page 763 - AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY : being a preparatory View of the Forces which concur to the Production of Chemical Phenomena. By J. FREDERIC DANIELL, FRS Professor of Chemistry in King's College, London ; and Lecturer on Chemistry and Geology in the Hon. East India Company's Military Seminary at Addiscombe ; and Author of Meteorological Essays.
Page 595 - ... the trees, the branches of which extend horizontally over the surface of the water. By their wild cries, and the length of their reeds, they prevent the horses from running away and reaching the bank of the pool. The eels, stunned by the noise, defend themselves by the repeated discharge of their electric batteries.

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