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BOSTON:
GOULD, KENDALL & LINCOLN.
UTICA, N. Y. : BENNETT & BRIGHT.

PHILADELPHIA: IRA M. ALLEN.

1836.

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It is reported to have been once said by Coleridge, “there is the love of the good for the good's sake, and the love of the truth for the truth's sake. To see, clearly, that the love of the good and the true is ultimately identical,- is given only to those who love both sincerely, and without any foreign ends." Alas! how often have they been disjoined! On the one side, how many have been disposed to promote what is good, at the expense of truth; and, on the other, how many, in promoting the cause of truth, have sacrificed what is good, and clothed themselves with the spirit of bitterness and strife as with a garment! A visible and acknowledged union among all Christians is a great good,—"a consummation devoutly to be wished,”—but how is it to be accomplished ? Most certainly, not by denunciation or silence; not by truces and compromises, by legislation or arts of diplomacy; but it must be done, if done at all, by each seeking truth with an honest heart, acting according to it, and speaking it in love. Christian union can flourish in no other soil, but a knowledge of the truth.“ If we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another." Whoever seeks truth from the love of it, and in love endeavors to diffuse it, does something to promote the real unity of the church. For, even if he adopts some incidental error, the spirit of his mind will lead him to receive fresh light with thankfulness, and thus truth will gain the greater triumph. As far as different sects of Christians are already agreed on essential truths, so far it becomes thein to cherish for each other, as Christians, a fervent fellowship. If we have “ one Lord, one faith, one God and Father of all,” even though we have not “one baptism,” we ought to love each other, with pure hearts fervently. "In such a case, we have already laid the basis for a cordial union of spirit, and through obedience to the truth, "have purified our souls unto unfeigned love of the brethren.”'

In consenting to the republication of the following review, it is far from being the wish of the writer to cherish or excite a spirit of controversy, but to invite fresh attention to a subject, which has al

ready received some regard in almost every Christian community, but which is destined to receive much more. The difference of opinion between the Baptists and other evangelical Christians, is not so much touching the spiritual doctrines of the church, as its constitution. They do already, if they breathe the spirit of their system, hold spiritual communion with all who love Christ,—the same kind of communion which will prevail in heaven, where the state of society will not require any tangible memorials, to transmit from age to age, the remembrance of the Saviour's death. But they differ from other Christians on the question, what is essential to the right constitution of the Christian church? They set out with the great principle, that none but moral agents, who act fiom choice, are proper subjects of church membership or church ordinances. They not only say, with others, that the church is a spiritual association, and that its constitution is not national, but thence infer that none are brought into alliance with it by natural birth, or blood, or parental dedication. They hold, with John Locke, that "a church is a free and voluntary society; nobody is born a member of any church; otherwise, the religion of parents would descend unto children, by the same right of inheritance as their temporal estates, and every one would hold his faith by the same tenure as he does his lands.” They deny, that there is any power inherent or conferred, in outward rites, to bring a human being into covenant with God. Hence, they withhold the initiating rite of Christianity from all, except those who profess repentance for sin and faith in Christ. These principles they deem of high importance, and value a right constitution of the church, not only because it is best adapted to preserve the purity of her doctrines, but because it bears upon it the sacred seal of God's authority.

To these principles they ask the attention of the world. They say, let them be examined by their own light, and the light of revelation. The very announcement of them is adapted to carry a conviction of responsibility to every man's bosom, and to lead each to think and act for himself, feeling, that while he lives in impenitence, he holds no special relation to God, on which his conscience can repose. They think, that these principles are the same as those preached by the apostles, the sane as those held in different ages by various communities of Christians, who acknowledged not the dominion of the Romish church, the same as those maintained by their own Roger Williams, who sought to secure them an asylum on the shores of Rhode Island, amid winter's cold, and tempest's blasts, and persecution still more relentless than a winter's sky, or “ the pelting of the pitiless storm.” Though they are more clearly seen and honored now than they were formerly, yet they remain too much in the shade. If they shall ever be brought fully out to light, and allowed their legitimate sway, we believe that era will be the precursor of the universal triumph of primitive Christianity.

VIEWS OF BAPTISM ;

BEING A

REVIEW OF "THE BAPTIZED CHILD."

pady received some regard in almost every Christian community,
fut which is destined to receive much more. The difference of
pinion between the Baptists and other evangelical Christians, is not

much touching the spiritual doctrines of the church, as its con-
itution. They do already, if they breathe the spirit of their sys-
Jm, hold spiritual communion with all who love Christ,—the same
And of communion which will prevail in heaven, where the state

society will not require any tangible memorials, to transmit from Je to age, the remembrance of the Saviour's death. But they dif

from other Christians on the question, what is essential to the |ht constitution of the Christian church? They set out with the pat principle, that none but moral agents, who act fiom choice,

proper subjects of church membership or church ordinances. ey not only say, with others, that the church is a spiritual associJon, and that its constitution is not national, but thence infer that ne are brought into alliance with it by natural birth, or blood, or ental dedication. They bold, with John Locke, that "a church h free and voluntary society; nobody is born a member of any rch; otherwise, the religion of parents would descend unto chilp, by the same right of inheritance as their temporal estates, and y one would hold his faith by the same tenure as he does his

They deny, that there is any power inherent or conferred, Jutward rites, to bring a human being into covenant with God. fe, they withhold the initiating rite of Christianity from all, exthose who profess repentance for sin and faith in Christ. These fiples they deem of high importance, and value a right constitupf the church, not only because it best adapted to preserve purity of her doctrines, but because it bears upon it the sacred If God's authority. these principles they ask the attention of the world. They þt them be examined by their own light, and the light of reve

The very announcement of them is adapted to carry a conof responsibility to every man's bosom, and to lead each to ind act for himself

, feeling, that while he lives in impenitence,
ds no special relation to God, on which his conscience can

They think, that these principles are the same as those
ped by the apostles, the same as those held in different ages by
şcommunities of Christians, who acknowledged not the domin-
he Romish church, the same as those maintained by their own
Williams, who sought to secure them an asylum on the shores
de Island, amid winter's cold, and tempest's blasts, and per-
I still more relentless than a winter's sky, or “the pelting of
Jess storm." Though they are more clearly seen and honored
n they were formerly, yet they remain too much in the shade.

shall ever be brought fully out to light, and allowed their
te sway, we believe that era will be the precursor of the
pl triumph of primitive Christianity.

This book is designed to awaken parents and children, who regard infant baptism as a divine institution, to a more vivid sense of their obligations, arising from the performance of that rite. “The motive in preparing it,” says the author, “is, to assist those who practise the rite, to do it with a full sense of its meaning and importance, and to see the beauty and use of the ordinance. The title of the book might be, in part, The Internal Evidences of Infant Baptism, as a reasonable and scriptural practice.” Here, indeed, an important object is proposed to view, and a most worthy motive to attain it. Considering the number and the character of those who exalt the sacredness of infant baptism, it is surprising, that this department of religious literature is not more amply filled. What a broad and inviting field is opened here, for strong argu

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