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Books Books 1 - 10 of 126 on No opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are necessary....
" No opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are necessary to the preservation of civil society, are to be tolerated by the magistrate. "
The Conservative standard of the British empire, erected in a time of ... - Page 37
by George Burges - 1835
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The Works of John Locke, Volume 6

John Locke - Philosophy - 1823
...of the event, but the rule of right. But to come to particulars. I say, first, No opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are...civil society, are to be tolerated by the magistrate. But of those indeed examples in any church are rare. For no sect can easily arrive to such a degree...
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Human Sacrifices in India: Substance of the Speech of John Poynder, Esq. at ...

John Poynder - Human sacrifice - 1827 - 261 pages
...therefore, " neither are they so in the worship of God." And again. — " I say no opinions contrary to " human society, or to those moral rules which...society, are " to be tolerated by the magistrate." Now, Sir, upon this principle precisely is the letter of Lord Wellesley, and his Council, founded ;...
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India's Cries to British Humanity: Relative to the Suttee, Infanticide ...

James Peggs - Hindu ethics - 1830 - 518 pages
...the principles of morality, reason, and humanity." Locke very justly observes, "No opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are...civil society, are to be tolerated by the magistrate." Upon this principle is the letter of Lord Wellesley and his council founded, — a principle only to...
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The Yorkshireman, a religious and literary journal, by a Friend [L. Howard ...

Luke Howard
...fellow-subjects, for a cause that has no relation to the end of Civil government. And yet no opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are...Civil society, are to be tolerated by the Magistrate, f The author might have given instances — we will suppose this, that it is lawful for parents to...
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Past and Present Policy of England Towards Ireland

Charles Greville - Ireland - 1845 - 359 pages
...the ground of the incompatibility of their religious tenets with civil government ; and because, " that church can have no right to be tolerated which is constituted on such a bottom, that all those who enter into it do thereby ipso facto deliver themselves up to the...
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Past and Present Policy of England Towards Ireland

Charles Greville - Ireland - 1845 - 359 pages
...the ground of the incompatibility of their religious tenets with civil government ; and because, " that church can have no right to be tolerated which is constituted on such a bottom, that all those who enter into it do thereby ipso facto deliver themselves up to the...
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Spiritual heroes: or, Sketches of the Puritans, their character and times

John Stoughton - Puritans - 1848 - 334 pages
...tolerate them. Even Locke affirms — " No opinions contrary to human so212 EAST ANGLIAN CHURCHES. ciety, or to those moral rules which are necessary to the...civil society, are to be tolerated by the magistrate." Referring to such persons as we have just named, he adds, " These, therefore, and the like, who attribute...
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Spiritual heroes; or, Sketches of the Puritans, their character and times

John Stoughton - 1850
...of their belief. Hence the refusal to tolerate them. Even Locke affirms, — " No opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are...civil society, are to be tolerated by the magistrate." Referring to such persons as we have just named, he adds, " These, therefore, and the like, who attribute...
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English Nonconformity

Robert Vaughan - Christianity - 1862 - 486 pages
...It was opinion which embraced a large, if not an unlimited, toleration, f * ' No opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules 'which are necessary to the preservation of-civil society, are to be ' tolerated by the magistrate. Those have no right to be tolerated by '...
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The Church as established in its relations with dissent

James Clark (M.A., Ph.D.) - 1866
...facto disqualified for citizenship : and he laid down yet more generally that " no opinions contrary to human society, or to those moral rules which are...civil society, are to be tolerated by the magistrate" * Warburton in like manner held that " the Quaker, the Anabaptist, the Papist, and the Atheist are...
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