Fire Ecology of Pacific Northwest Forests

Front Cover
Island Press, Mar 1, 1996 - Science - 505 pages
The structure of most virgin forests in the western United States reflects a past disturbance history that includes forest fire. James K. Agee, an expert in the emergent field of fire ecology, analyzes the ecological role of fire in the creation and maintenance of natural western forests, focusing primarily on forest stand development patterns. His discussion of the natural fire environment and the environmental effects of fire is applicable to a wide range of temperate forests.
 

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Contents

Ch 1 The Natural Fire Regime
3
Ch 2 The Natural Fire Environment
25
Ch 3 The Cultural Fire Environment
53
Ch 4 Methods for Fire History
75
Ch 5 Fire Effects on Vegetation
113
Ch 6 Environmental Effects on Fire
151
Ch 7 Sitka Spruce Coast Redwood and Western Hemlock Forests
187
Ch 8 Pacific Silver Fir and Red Fir Forests
226
Ch 11 Ponderosa Pine and Lodgepole Pine Forests
320
Ch 12 Northwest Woodlands
351
Ch 13 Fire in Our Future
386
Appendix A Common Conversion Factors
409
Appendix B Names of Plants Mentioned in Text
411
Glossary
417
References
421
Index
477

Ch 9 Subalpine Ecosystems
250
Ch 10 MixedConiferMixedEvergreen Forests
280
Board of Directors
497
Copyright

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About the author (1996)


James K. Agee is professor of forest ecology in the College of Forest Resources at the University of Washington, Seattle. He recently completed a five-year term as chair of the Division of Ecosystem Science and Conservation, and he continues to teach and conduct research on forest and fire ecology. Before coming to the University of Washington, he was a forest ecologist and research biologist for the National Park Service in Seattle and San Francisco. Agee received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1973. He is the author of more than 100 technical reports and professional papers in forest and fire ecology, and he has extensive experience with fire research and management in the Pacific Coast states. He has been a trustee for the Washington chapter of The Nature Conservancy, was chair to the Washington Natural Heritage Council, and associate editor of Northwest Science.


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