The life and works of William Cowper: now first completed by the introduction of his "Private correspondence.", Volume 1

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Saunders and Otley, 1836
 

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Page 24 - For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness ; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God.
Page 3 - A thousand other themes less deeply traced. Thy nightly visits to my chamber made, That thou might'st know me safe and warmly laid; Thy morning bounties ere I left my home, The biscuit, or confectionary plum...
Page 3 - All this, and more endearing still than all, Thy constant flow of love, that knew no fall, Ne'er roughened by those cataracts and breaks, That humour interposed too often makes; All this still legible in memory's page, And still to be so to my latest age...
Page 73 - For what is our hope, or joy, or crown of rejoicing? Are not even ye in the presence of our Lord Jesus Christ at his coming?
Page 253 - I love the memory of Vinny Bourne. I think him a better Latin poet than Tibul'lus, Propertius, Ausonius, or any of the writers in his way, except Ovid, and not at all inferior to him.
Page 342 - Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England, did adorn. The first, in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next, in majesty; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go; To make a third, she joined the former two.
Page 11 - Doom'd, as I am, in solitude to waste The present moments, and regret the past ; Deprived of every joy I valued most, My friend torn from me, and my mistress lost ; Call not this gloom I wear, this anxious mien, The dull effect of humour, or of spleen ! Still, still, I mourn, with each returning day, Him u snatch'd by fate, in early youth away ; And her. . through tedious years of doubt and pain, Fix'd in her choice, and faithful. . but in vain.
Page 216 - Then holding the spectacles up to the court — Your lordship observes they are made with a straddle As wide as the ridge of the Nose is; in short, Designed to sit close to it, just like a saddle.
Page 156 - At present, the difference between them and me is greatly to their advantage. I delight in baubles, and know them to be so ; for rested in, and viewed without a reference to their Author, what is the earth, — what are the planets, — what is the sun itself but a bauble ? Better...
Page 140 - It is like that of a fine organ ; has the fullest and the deepest tones of majesty, with all the softness and elegance of the. Dorian flute. Variety without end and never equalled, unless perhaps by Virgil.

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