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P. OVIDII NASONIS

FASTORUM

LIBER VI.

EDITED WITH NOTES

BY

A. SIDGWICK, M.A.

LATE FELLOW OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, AND ASSISTANT

MASTER IN RUGBY SCHOOL.

EDITED FOR THE SYNDICS OF THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

BIBLIOTHECA

JUN 1878

Cambridge:
AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

CODLEIANO

London: CAMBRIDGE WAREHOUSE, 17, PATERNOSTER Row.
Cambridge: DEIGHTON, BELL, AND CO.

1878

[All Rights reserved.]

Cambridge :

PRINTED BY C. J. CLAY, M.A.

AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

PREFATORY NOTE.

This Edition, being prepared for the use of those Students who are not far advanced in Latin, does not aim at doing more than supplying in a small compass such help to the thorough knowledge of this book as it is probable would be most useful to them. It is not intended to supply the place of a dictionary: for all students possess one, and derive much benefit from its careful use, both in becoming acquainted with the history of ineanings of words, and also in the exercise of that judgment which is required to select the right meaningOn the other hand historical and mythical allusions are explained in the notes, as many students might find it difficult to make them out otherwise. Great care also has been taken to notice all the grammatical usages which might offer any difficulty, and to classify them clearly, and to enable the learner, by means of an Index (and Scheme of the uses of the Subjunctive), to compare and distinguish the various usages. The reader's attention has also been drawn here and there to the special peculiarities of style.

The book being full of allusions to temples, buildings, hills, roads, &c., in Rome, it has been thought best to prepare a small sketch-map, containing all the places or buildings alluded to in the book. The scale of the Map has rendered it desirable to omit all details, except those which are mentioned in the Text. This will make the Map much clearer, and easier to use. The leading features have obviously been retained.

The Text adopted has been mainly that of Rudolph Merkel, Leipzig, 1876. In one or two places I have however adopted

the corrections of other editors or scholars, such as Madvig, Bentley, and Peter.

The book which has been most useful to me in the preparation of the notes has been Ovid's Fasti für die Schule erklärt, von Hermann Peter, Leipzig, 1874 : an admirable commentary which with its Critical Appendix supplies nearly every need of the reader of Ovid.

I have also consulted on many points Merkel's Prolegomena to Ovid's Fasti (Berlin, 1841), a learned and exhaustive but needlessly tedious book.

For the topography of Rome, and for help in constructing the Map, I have been indebted to the magnificent work on ‘Rome and the Campagna,' by the Rev. Robert Burn, of Trinity College, Cambridge. The constant use I have made of it has only brought out more clearly to me the extreme accuracy and thoroughness with which it is written.

I have given two Indices : an Index of grammar and general matters; and an Index of names. The latter has been thought desirable, owing to the large number of allusions in the book.

[N. B. In one or two places expurgations have been necessary, and I have omitted the unfit passages, altering occasionally a word or two, to keep the connexion clear. In all cases the original numbers have been retained, as otherwise there might be a difficulty about references.] INTRODUCTION.

THE little that needs to be said by way of introduction will be most useful if divided into heads.

These heads are as follows:

§ 1. Outline of the life of Ovid.
§ 2. Ovid's works : date of the Fasti.
§ 3. The subject of the Fasti.
§ 4. The Reformation of the Calendar.
§ 5. The Classification of the days.
§ 6. The Astronomy of Ovid.
§ 7. A List of Gods.

The scheme of the subjunctive will be found at the end of the notes, before the two Indices.

§ 1. Outline of the life of Ovid. Publius Ovidius Naso (the surname means the big-nosed', being originally a nickname, no doubt, like many of the Roman cognomina, though they were regularly continued in the same family, and often, like Cicero, Brutus, Scipio, carried only the most honourable associations) was born 20 March 43, just one year after Julius Caesar's murder. His father had a farm at Sulmo, in the country of the Peligni (about the centre of the hills E. of Rome) and the boy was brought up as a lawyer. It is said, as might be expected from the turn of his genius, that he was a good

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