Historical and descriptive account of British India, by H. Murray

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Page 158 - The increase of our revenue is the subject of our care, as much as our trade; 'tis that must maintain our force, when twenty accidents may interrupt our trade; 'tis that must make us a nation in India...
Page 174 - O YE WHO HAVE SEEN THE GLORY OF ALP ARSLAN EXALTED TO THE HEAVENS, REPAIR TO MARU, AND YOU WILL BEHOLD IT BURIED IN THE DUST!
Page 82 - Lord of the Navigation, Conquest, and Commerce of Ethiopia, Arabia, Persia, and India.
Page 656 - The Sikh army has now, without a shadow of provocation, invaded the British territories. " The Governor-General must, therefore, take measures for effectually protecting the British provinces, for vindicating the authority of the British Government, and for punishing the violators of treaties and the disturbers of public peace. The Governor-General hereby declares the possessions of Maharajah Dhuleep Singh, on the left or British banks of the Sutlej, confiscated and annexed to the British territories.
Page 645 - ... force continued to sweep the camp, bearing down all opposition, and dislodged the enemy from their whole position. The line then halted, as if on a day of manoeuvre, receiving its two leaders as they rode along its front with a gratifying cheer, and displaying the captured standards of the Khalsa army. We had taken upwards of seventy-three pieces of cannon, and were masters of the whole field.
Page 644 - ... -wild cries of the Sikhs, our English hurrah, the tramp of men, and the groans of the dying. In this state, with a handful of men, who had carried the batteries the night before, I remained till morning, taking very short intervals of rest by lying down with various...
Page 481 - If there was anything wrong, it was in giving battle; but in the conduct of the action, everything was right. General Wellesley gave every part of his army its full share ; left no part of it unemployed ; but supported, sometimes with cavalry, sometimes with infantry, every point that was pressed at the very moment that it was most necessary.
Page 695 - Wherefore, in compensation for the past, and for better security in the future, the Governor-General in Council has resolved, and hereby proclaims, that the province of Pegu is now, and shall be henceforth, a portion of the British Territories in the East...
Page 658 - Singh, the faithful ally, of the British power. The Governor-General, at this moment of a most complete and decisive victory, cannot give a stronger proof of the forbearance and moderation of the British Government than by making this declaration of his intentions, the terms and mode of the arrangement remaining for further adjustment.
Page 630 - I regret to say that our loss has been very severe, infinitely beyond what I calculated on ; indeed I did not do justice to the gallantry of my opponents. Their force, however, so greatly exceeded ours, particularly in artillery ; the position of their guns was so commanding ; they were so well served, and determinedly defended, both by their gunners and their infantry, and the peculiar difficulties of the country giving the defending force so great advantages, that it could not be otherwise.

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