Screen Ecologies: Art, Media, and the Environment in the Asia-Pacific Region

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MIT Press, May 13, 2016 - Art - 210 pages

How new media and visual artists provide alternative ways for understanding and visualizing the entanglements of media and the environment in the Asia-Pacific.

Images of environmental disaster and degradation have become part of our everyday media diet. This visual culture focusing on environmental deterioration represents a wider recognition of the political, economic, and cultural forces that are responsible for our ongoing environmental crisis. And yet efforts to raise awareness about environmental issues through digital and visual media are riddled with irony, because the resource extraction, manufacturing, transportation, and waste associated with digital devices contribute to environmental damage and climate change. Screen Ecologies examines the relationship of media, art, and climate change in the Asia-Pacific region—a key site of both environmental degradation and the production and consumption of climate-aware screen art and media.

Screen Ecologies shows how new media and visual artists provide alternative ways for understanding the entanglements of media and the environment in the Asia-Pacific. It investigates such topics as artists' exploration of alternative ways to represent the environment; regional stories of media innovation and climate change; the tensions between amateur and professional art; the emergence of biennials, triennials, and new arts organizations; the theme of water in regional art; new models for networked collaboration; and social media's move from private to public realms. A generous selection of illustrations shows a range of artist's projects.

 

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Contents

1 An Introduction
1
2 Media Art Climate Publics
21
3 Connections and Disconnections
39
4 Screen Cultures in the AsiaPacific
57
5 Platforms for Public Engagement
89
6 Art Critique and Climate Change
109
7 Emergent Paradigms for Collaboration
131
8 Greening Intimate Publics
149
9 Refiguring Art Media and Environment
173
References
185
Index
203
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About the author (2016)

Larissa Hjorth, an artist ethnographer, is Professor in the School of Media and Communication at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT).

Sarah Pink is Professor in the School of Media and Communications at RMIT.

Kristen Sharp is Senior Lecturer in the School of Art at RMIT.

Linda Williams is Associate Professor in the School of Art at RMIT.

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