Starvation Lake

Front Cover
Little, Brown Book Group, Dec 1, 2012 - Fiction - 370 pages
34 Reviews

A lakeside town in the depths of Michigan must face its darkest secrets . . .

In the dead of a Michigan winter, the small town of Starvation Lake is shaken by what washes up on the lake's edge one night: pieces of the snowmobile which disappeared into the murky depths years ago, along with the town's legendary hockey coach. But everybody knows this accident happened on another lake, five miles away. As rumours start to fly, the evidence points one way: murder.

To Gus Carpenter, editor of the local paper and long-serving victim of the town's hostility for a youthful mistake, this is a double-edged sword. He has the chance to prove himself as a reporter, but the deeper he digs the closer he comes to some shadowy gaps in the town's past which are hiding some disturbing secrets. Secrets which those closest to him will kill to keep hidden.

The first novel in Bryan Gruley's award-winning Starvation Lake series.

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User Review  - kings1kid - Overstock.com

THE BOOK WAS OK, BUT CONFUSING WITH TO MANY CHARACTERS AND THEIR NICKNAMES. A GOOD THOUGHT OUT STORY. I WAS GLAD TO REACH THE ENDING WITH STILL HAVING CONFUSION. Read full review

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User Review  - jimgysin - LibraryThing

A remarkable debut mystery full of reminders that small town life on the east side of Lake Michigan isn't all that different than small town life on my own west side of it. Of the many plot elements ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Bryan Gruley is the critically acclaimed author of three novels. Starvation Lake was nominated for an Edgar Award for Best First Novel and The Hanging Tree was Kirkus Reviews' Best Mystery of 2010. Growing up, Bryan spent many weekends at his family cottage on Big Twin Lake in Michigan - not far from the real Starvation Lake. He is now a reporter-at-large for Bloomberg News, after nearly sixteen years with The Wall Street Journal, where he shared in the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the September 11 terrorist attacks. He lives in Chicago with his wife, Pam. They have three grown children.

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