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distinctions. The further relations of the same subject to each of the arts considered separately are unfolded in three essays, namely:

Poetry as a Representative Art;

Music as a Representative Art, printed for convenience in the volume treating of Rhythm and Harmony; and

Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture as Representative Arts.

The Genesis of Art-Form traces the derivation of the elements of form from their sources in mind or matter and the development, according to mental and physical requirements, of these elements so as to produce, when combined, the different art-forms. The volume directs attention to the characteristics of form essential to æsthetic effects in all the arts. The characteristics essential to each of the arts considered in itself, are discussed in two volumes completing the series, namely:

Rhythm and Harmony in Poetry and Music; and

Proportion and Harmony of Line and Color in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture.

The author wishes to express his indebtedness to Messrs. D. Appleton & Co., Houghton, Mifflin & Co., and others, for their kind permission to insert in this work certain entire poems, of which they hold the copyrights.

Altered from the Preface to the First Edition,

PRINCETON, N. J., November, 1899.

TABLE OF CONTENTS,

CONVERSATION, DISCOURSE, ELOCUTION, VERSIFICA-

TION

19-31

Representative Character of Intonations, 19–Every Man has a
Rhythm and a Tune of his own, 19-Physiological Reason for
this, 20—Cultivated by Public Speaking, 21–Recitative, and the
Origin of Poetic and Musical Melody, 21—Poetry, Song, Dance,

PAGB

all connected: but not developed from each other, 22—Poetic

Pause and Accent are Developed only from Speech, 23—Pause, the

Source of Verse, 25—Breathing and the Line, 25—Hebrew

Parallelism ; Greek, 25—The Cæsura, 26—Accent, the Source of

Rhythm and Tune, 27-Feet: how produced in English, 28—In

the Classic Languages, 29-Metrical Possibilities of English, 30.

III.

ELOCUTION: Its REPRESENTATIVE ELEMENTS CLASSI-

FIED

Pause and Accent, 32—Analyzed, the Former gives us the Element

of Duration, the Latter gives Duration, Force, Pitch, and Quality,

33—Must find what each Element represents in DISCOURSIVE

ELOCUTION, developed from Ejaculatory or Instinctive Modes of

Utterance, and in DRAMATIC ELOCUTION, developed from Imitative

or Reflective Utterance; and then apply to Poetry, 33—General

Statement of what is Represented by Duration, Force, Pitch, and

Quality, ; Rhythm the Effect of the First Two, and Tune of the

Last Two, 34.

IV.

ELOCUTIONARY AND Poetic DURATION

37-49

The Elements entering into Rhythm: Duration, and Force, 37–

Duration : Fast Time Instinctive, representing Unimportant Ideas ;

Slow Time Reflective, representing Important Ideas ; Movement

a Combination of the Two, 37—The Pause as used in Elocution,

38—In Poetry, at the Ends of Lines, 39—In the Cæsura, 40—Run-

on and End-stopped Lines, 40—Quantity, Short and Long, in.

Elocution and Poetry; as produced by Vowels and Consonants, 41,

-Movement or Rhythm as influenced by Pause and Quantity, 44–

Feet of Three Syllables should represent Rapidity, 45—Predomi-

nating Long Quantity injures English Hexameters, 46—Feet of

Four Syllables represent Rapidity, 49.

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Poetic Analogucs, 51–Loudness and Softness, Strength and Weak-

ness, Great and Slight Weight as represented by Long or Short,

Accented or Unaccented Syllables, 52.

VI.

FORCE AS THE SOURCE AND INTERPRETER OF POETIC

MEASURES

Gradations of Force or Stress, representing Reflective Influence

exerted on Instinctive Tendency, 57—What is represented by the

the Different kinds of Elocutionary Stress, 58—Why Elocutionary

Stress corresponds to Poetic Measure, 59–Classification of Eng-

lish Poetic Measures, and their Classic Analogues, 60—What is

represented by Initial Double Measure, 62—Its Classic Form, 63

-By Terminal Double Measure, 65—Why used in Our Hymns,

67—Its Classic Form, 67–Triple Measures ; Median, 68—Its

Classic Form, 70—Initial Triple Measure, 70—Could also be termed

Compound Measure, corresponding to Compound Stress, 70—Its

Classic Form, 72—Its Use in Greek Pæonics, 72—In Pathos,

corresponding to Tremulous Stress, 73—Terminal Triple Measure,

74-Can correspond to Thorough Stress, 74-Its Classic Form,

75—Blending of Different Triple Measures, 75–Of Triple and

Double Measures to prevent Monotony, 76–Quadruple Measures,

Di-initial and Di-terminal, 77—Blending of all kinds of Measures

to represent Movements, 79.

VII.

ELOCUTIONARY AND POETIC REGULARITY OF FORCE,

82-88

Regularity of Force, combining its Instinctive with Reflective

Tendencies, and representing Emotive Influence, 82—Abrupt and

Smooth Force, as used in Elocution, and Irregular and Regular

Accentuation corresponding to them in Poetry, 82—Abruptness in

short and long Lines, 85–Imitative Effects, 87.

VIII.

ELOCUTIONARY AND POETIC PITCH-TUNES OF VERSE, 89-102

Elements entering into the Tunes of Verse : Pitch and Quality, 89

- Pitch representing Reflective Tendency or Intellectual Motive,

90-On its Instinctive Side by High and Low Key, 91–What each

represents, 91-On its Reflective, by Rising, Falling, and Circum-

PAGR

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