A Select Collection of Original Letters: Written by the Most Eminent Persons, on Various Entertaining Subjects, and on Many Important Occasions: from the Reign of Henry the Eighth, to the Present Time

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J. and J. Rivington and R. and J. Dodsley, 1755 - English letters

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Page 204 - Let him study the Holy Scriptures, especially the New Testament. Therein are contained the words of eternal life. It has God for its Author ; salvation for its end ; and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter.
Page 144 - Comedy may be allow'd to speak them. From a Witty Man they are expected; and even a Fool may be permitted to stumble on 'em by chance. Tho...
Page 2 - ... much declined by fair ladies, old age : may she live to be very old, and yet seem young, be told so by her glass, and have no aches to inform her of the truth : and when she shall appear to be mortal, may her Lord not mourn for her, but go hand in hand with her to that place where we are told there is neither marrying nor giving in marriage, that being there divorced we may all have an equal interest in her again.
Page 266 - He walked ten hours a day, would not eat or drink if his servant stayed in the room. His meat was served up ready cut, and sometimes it would lie an hour on the table before he would touch it, and then eat it walking.
Page 180 - ... they are not so much as taught to spell in their childhood, nor can ever attain to it in their whole lives.
Page 193 - I cannot live a week longer. At this time my spirits fail me ; and it is the ardent love I have for you that carries me beyond my strength, and enables me to tell you, the...
Page 128 - For my morals betwixt man and man, I am not to be my own judge. I appeal to the world, if I have deceiv'd or defrauded any man: and for my private conversation, they who see me every day can be the best witnesses, whether or no it be blameless and inoffensive. Hitherto I have no reason to complain that men of either party shun my company.
Page 143 - But such little remarks as may be continued within the compass of a letter, and such unpremeditated thoughts as may be communicated between friend and friend, without incurring the censure of the world, or setting up for a dictator you shall have from me since you have enjoined it.
Page 180 - ... next her about a new cargo of fans. • It is a little hard that not one gentleman's daughter in a thousand should be brought to read...
Page 179 - I cannot conceive you to be human creatures, but a certain sort of species hardly a degree above a monkey ; who has more diverting tricks than any of you, is an animal less mischievous and expensive, might in time be a tolerable critic in velvet and brocade, and for aught I know, would equally become them.

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