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MICHAEL DINNEEN’s cottage in Carrigarinka village wore a deserted look when I passed it on my way to the railway junction. Not that it ever looked particularly comfortable or prosperous, nor, indeed, could Dinneen himself be described in these terms. An ex-soldier, who had lost an arm in the war, he was a comparatively recent settler in the village, driven there, it was reported, by ill-treatment received in his native place, which happened to be fiercely Sinn Fein and pro-German. I gathered he was popular in his new home. His neighbours treated him with cautious friendliness. He managed to obtain employment in the telegraph office in a country town three miles off, and went his way unmolested. As I drove my car down the village street I realised that WOL. CCIX.-NO. MCCLXIII.

OF THE DANCING.

Carrigarinka was keeping a compulsory holiday—the third within the week. From at least one window in every house a Sinn Fein flag hung limply in the mild spring air; even the whitewashed wall round the pump was enlivened by stripes of green and yellow paint. In the distance I could see the limestone crag known as the little rock of the dancing, with a defiantly large flag tied to a stunted tree on its summit. The rock itself was a landmark visible for many miles. In the field below the country people formerly assembled for games and dancing. Later, the rock overlooked less innocent occupations, for, when not detained at the nation's expense, the chief Sinn Feiner of the district, one Teige O'Leary (or, as he patriotically rendered it, Tadg Laeghire), lived beneath its shelter. A

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TALES OF THE R.I.C., . . . . . . 409, 668
THE JOLLY ROGER. BY DOUGLAS G. BROWNE, .

319

THE LITTLE ROCK OF THE DANCING, . . . . . 1

THE REGIMENTAL DURBAR. BY MAJOR-GENERAL SIR GEORGE

YOUNGHUSBAND, K.C.M.G., K.C.I.E., O.B., . . . . 617

THE SAGA OF A SHIP. BY DAVD HANNAY, .

. 628

THE VOYAGE HOME. BY ALAN GRAHAM, 148, 338, 487, 599, 731

VAGABOND IMPRESSIONS. BY ST JOHN LUCAS, . . . 399
VIGNETTES. BY ELLA MACMAHON, . . . . . . 193

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MICHAEL DINNEEN'S cottage Carrigarinka was keeping a in Carrigarinka village wore a compulsory holiday-the third deserted look when I passed within the week. From at it on my way to the railway least one window in every junction. Not that it ever house a Sinn Fein flag hung looked particularly comfortable limply in the mild spring air ; or prosperous, nor, indeed, even the whitewashed wall could Dinneen himself be de- round the pump was enlivened scribed in these terms.

by stripes of green and yellow An ex-soldier, who had lost paint. In the distance I could an arm in the war, he was a see the limestone crag known comparatively recent settler in as the little rock of the dancing, the village, driven there, it was with a defiantly large flag tied reported, by ill-treatment re- to a stunted tree on its summit. ceived in his native place, The rock itself was a landmark which happened to be fiercely visible for many miles. In the Sinn Fein and pro-German. field below the country people I gathered he was popular in formerly assembled for games his new home. His neighbours and dancing. Later, the rock treated him with cautious overlooked less innocent occufriendliness. He managed to pations, for, when not detained obtain employment in the tele- at the nation's expense, the graph office in a country town chief Sinn Feiner of the disthree miles off, and went his trict, one Teige O'Leary (or, as way unmolested.

he patriotically rendered it, As I drove my car down the Tadg Laeghire), lived beneath village street I realised that its shelter.

VOL. CCIX.-NO. MCCLXIII.

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