The Scenery of Switzerland and the Causes to which it is Due

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Macmillan, 1906 - Alps - 489 pages
 

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Page 13 - THERE rolls the deep where grew the tree. O earth, what changes hast thou seen ! There where the long street roars, hath been The stillness of the central sea. The hills are shadows, and they flow From form to form, and nothing stands ; They melt like mist, the solid lands, Like clouds they shape themselves and go.
Page 370 - The torrent is in shape curving over the rock, like the tail of a white horse streaming in the wind, such as it might be conceived would be that of the ' pale horse ' on which Death is mounted in the Apocalypse.
Page 457 - Land; a chain of islands run from the end of the peninsula of Aliaska ; Greenland has a group of islands at its extremity ; and Sicily lies close...
Page 458 - Now, may we not correlate this with the remarkable preponderance of ocean in the southern hemisphere, which M. Adhemar has suggested to be due to the alteration of the centre of gravity of the Earth, caused by the great southern cupola of ice ? " However that may be, the preponderance of water in the south is very remarkable. Taking each parallel as unity, the proportion of sea is as follows : — No.
Page 101 - a belt or band of blocks — poised, as it were, on a mountain side, it may be five hundred feet above the alluvial flat through which the Rhone winds below. This belt has no great vertical height, but extends for miles — yes, for miles — along the mountain side, composed of blocks of Granite of thirty, forty, fifty, and sixty feet in the side, not a few, but by hundreds, fantastically balanced...
Page 138 - ... would not be in the direction AB only, but also at right angles to it, in the direction AC, though the amount of folding might be much greater in one direction than in the other. Thus in the case of Switzerland, while the main folds run southwest by north-east, there would be others at right angles to the main axis. The complex structure of the Swiss mountains may be partly due to the coexistence of these two directions of pressure at right angles to one another.
Page 480 - FG SINCLAIR, MA, and D. SHARP, MA, FRS VOL. VI. INSECTS. Part II. By D. SHARP, MA, FRS VOL. VIII. AMPHIBIA AND REPTILES. By H. GADOW, MA, FRS VOL. IX. BIRDS. By AH EVANS, MA VOL. X. MAMMALIA. By FE BEDDARD, MA (Oxon.), FRS (Prosector to the Zoological Society).
Page 288 - ... blazoned fires, The height, the space, the gloom, the glory ! A mount of marble, a hundred spires ! 1 climbed the roofs at break of day ; Sun-smitten Alps before me lay. I stood among the silent statues, And statued pinnacles, mute as they. How faintly flushed, how phantom-fair, Was Monte Rosa hanging there A thousand shadowy-pencilled valleys And snowy dells in a golden air.
Page 101 - ... thirty, forty, fifty, and sixty feet in the side — not a few, but by hundreds, fantastically balanced on the angles of one another, their grey weather-beaten tops standing out in prominent relief from the verdant slopes of secondary formation on which they rest.

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