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8th. Phondee, Kormee, 10th June. He stabbed himself with a sword and died, in consequence of pain in his arm, which had been broken in a fall from a wall.

9th. Mohun, Brahiman, 21st July. He shot him. self with a ball from a matchlock, in consequence of much suffering from inflammation of the bowels.

10th. Aman, Brahman. On the 2d August, hung himself, in consequnce of a dispute with his wife.

11th. Tejiea, a female, Lodhee, 5th August. Hung hereslf, in consequnce of suffering from the inflammation of the bowels.

12th. Bichoo his wife and daughter, Weaver, 12th August. These three persons all threw themselves into a well and killed themselves, in consequence of opthel. mia and sever from which they suffered a good deal. 13th. The mother of Kuthora, Barber, 21st August. Threw herself into a well and killed herself in consequence of grief for the death of her son Kurhora. 14th. Jykeea, a female Kormee, 25th August. She threw herself into a well and destroyed herself, in a fit of insanity. 15th. Khengoo, female, Gardener, 28th August. She threw herself into a well and destroyed herself, in consequence of a dispute with the second wife of her husband. 16th. Choteea, female Braham, 28th August. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, from pain in sickness. 17. Kumeea, female, Cotwar, 28th August. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, in a state of insanity. 18. Name not written, Chumar, 27th August; Threw herself into a well and killed herself, from the want of food or the means of providing it. 19th. Luchmun, Lodhee, 1st September. Threw himself into a well and killed himself from severe rheu. matic pains. 20th. Burhoo, female, Shopkeeper, 12th September. Threw herself into a well and destroyed herself in consequence of the importunity of her creditors. 21st. Khuroog, female, Shopkeeper, 27th September. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, in conse. quence of severe suffering in sickness. 22nd. Oojeealee, female, Chumar, 30th September. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, in conse. quence of a dispute with her husband. 23d. Anoopa, female, Oil-vender, 3d October. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, in conse. quence of great suffering from sores from which she could not keep the worms. 24th. Heera, female, Shopkeeper, 7th October. She threw herself into a well and killed herself, in con. sequence of shame at some abusive language her hus. band had used towards her. 25th. Wife of Pertaub, Rajpoot, 13th October. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, in conse. quence of sufferings in child-birth. 26th. Pretheeraj Dhangee, 20th October. Hung himself from the want of food, or the means of pro: viding it. 27th. Makeea, female, Oil-vender, 20th October. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, in consequence of a dispute with some members of her family. 28th. Kulloo, Lodhee, 27th October. Hung him. self in consequence of great suffering from a large boil into which the worms had got. 29th. Kuseea, female, Shopkeeper, 13th November. Threw herself into a well and killed herself, from suffer. ings in sickness. 30th. Hunsee, and her son, Lodhee, 13th November. They both hung themselves in consequence of sufferings in sickness; . It is not clear from the report, whether the son killed himself or was killed by his mother. 31st. Ram Sing, Lodhee, 18th November. Killed himself with a ball from a matchlock, in consequence o sufferings in sickness.

Report of suicides in the District of Central Ind's, which took place during the year 1835. The population of the District is about two hundred and fifty or three hundred thousand.

1st. Foolsa, a native woman of the Sonar cast, hung herself in the town of Khimlassa, 10th January, on account of a severe pain for which she could find no remedy. 2d. Suroopee, a native woman of the Rajpoot cast, hung herself on the 11th January, in the twon of Karaore, on account of a dispute with the mother of her usband. 3d. Gonda, a native woman, a shopkeeper, threw herself into a well and killed herself on the 12th January, in the village of Narhut, on account of a severe pain in her stomach. 4th. Mandoo, a native woman of the Sonar cast, threw herself into a well and killed herself on the 20th January; cause not discovered. 5th. The wife of Kurheree, a gardner, on the 16th February, threw herself into a well and killed herself on account of long suffering from severe dysentery. 6th The wife of Madaree, a shop-keeper, on the 28th February, threw herself into a well and killed herself because she had been expelled from her cast on suspicion of adultery, in the town of Malthore. 7th. Magoo, a female shop-keeper, on the 2d of March, threw herself into a well and killed herself in the town of Banorka—the cause could not be discovered. 8th. Sujun Sing Thakur, a Rajpoot, on the 7th of March hung himself, from affliction caused by the death of his son. 9th. Sheranee, a female of the Rajpoot cast on the 18th March hung herself in the twon of Saugor, srom affliction caused by the death of her only son. 10th. Morundee, a female of the Brahman cast, on the 22d March hung herself in Saugor, from grief at the death of her son. I lth. Beea, a female of the Brahman cast, on the 26th March, on account of the pains which followed the birth of a daughter, threw herself down a well and killed herself. Town of Saugor. 12th. In the town of Saugor, on the 2d of April, a traveller threw himself into a well and killed himself —the cause could not be discovered. 13th. Amuroo, a female of the Chumar cast, on the 15th of April, first threw her infant into a well, and then jumped in after it; the child was taken out alive, but she was dead. She had stolen some things from Dome, barber, and they were found in her house, and she could not survive the disgrace of being detected. 14th. Ram Sing, a Chumar, on the 20th April, cut his throat with a seah hook, on account of a severe pain in the eyes, which no one could cure. 15th. Kesur, a female of the gardener cast, on the 23d April, threw herself into a well and was killed —the cause not discovered. 16th. On the 4th May, Nunhee, Bahoo, a female of the Rajpoot cast, shot herself with a matchlock, in consequence of much suffering from an obstinate disease. Town of Khimlassa. 17th. On the 26th May, in the town of Saugor, Ieera, a native woman of the gardener cast, threw herself into a well and killed herself, on account of pain in the stomach.

18th. On the 3d June, Puncheea, a female of the Brahman cast, at Narhut, threw herself into a well, and killed herself-no cause ascertained.

19th. On the 18th July, Omedee, a female of the Gosaen cast, threw herself into a well in a fit of madness, and died.

20th. The mother of Duleeau, Lodhee, on the 27th July, threw herself into a well, from having nothing to eat, and suffering from disease, aud died.

21st. On the 28th July, at Gumbereen, Suroopa, a female of the Teylee cast, threw herself into a well, on account of suffering from a pain in the stomach, and died. 22nd. On the 4th August, Kesur, o female of the Rajpoot cast, threw herself into a well in a fit of madness, and died. Town of Korar. 23rd. On the 5th of August, the wife of Buljoo, Lodhee, threw herself into a well, on account of suffering from worms in her nose, and died. 24th. On the 23rd. of August, Nowloo, the wife of a barber, threw herself into a well, in the town of Khimlassa, on account of a severe pain in the stomach, with which she had been afflicted for five mouths. 25th. On the 23rd of August, in the town of Saugor, a Moosulman threw himself into a well and killed himself, on acconnt of his sufferings from disease. séth. On the 25th August, Bhow Sing, Chumar, of Jysingnugur, first put his daughter, Bhageea, to death, and then cut his own throat, because she rejected, with indignation, his dishonourable proposals. 27th. On the 21st August, Gunesh, a Rajpoot, threw himself into a well and killed himself, because he had been accaused of adultery by Kishan Sing. 28th. On the 4th September, Nunhee, a female of the Brahman cast, threw herself into a well and killed herself, on account of a severe pain in the stomach. 29th. On the 7th September, Sirdar, a Rajpoot, hung himself, on account of a severe pain in his eyes. 30th. On the 15th September, in the village of Banda, Jusoda, the wife of a barber, threw herself into a well and killed herself, on account of suffering from dysentery 31st. On the 30th of September, Futteh, a guala, hung himself, from grief at the death of his wife and two daughters, who had all three died within the space of three or four days, in the town of Malthore.

well and killed herself, on account of a dispute with the wife of Kishun, gardener, about grinding some flour. 33rd. On the 30th September, in the town of Saugor, Dursoo, a potter, threw himself into a well and killed himself, on account of severe pain in the belly. 34th. On the 24th October, in the town of Malthone, Kohman, a Brahman, jumped into the river and drowned himself, on account of leprosy, which had broken out on him. 35th. On the 28th of October, in the same town, the wife of Pemer, Lodhee, hung herself, on account of severe suffering from asthma. 36th. On the 31st October, in the srme town, Motee, a Brahman, loaded his gun and shot himself, in a fit of madness. 37th. On the 18th November, in the town of Khimlassa, mehrajoo, the wife of a gardener, jumped into a well and killed herself, on occount of a quarret between her husband and Ram Sing, a farmer. 38th. On the 23rd November, Poneea, a female of the Cowherd cast, hung herself, on account of a severe pain in the stomach. 39th. On the 30th of November, in the Purgunnah of Khimlassa, Gomanoo, the wife of a brazier, jumped into a well and killed herself, from grief at the death of her son. 40th. On the 14th December, in the town of Kurapore, Mehrajoo, a female of the Brahman cast, jumped into a well and killed herself, on acconnt of a severe pain in the eyes. While in charge of the Sauger District, in the year 1831, I ordered all police officers in reporting cases of suicide, to mention the motives for self-destruction as far as they could be ascertained. The above report is for the year 1835, the only one by me. W. H. S.

32nd. On the 30th September, in the same town. Bindeea, the wife of a gardener, threw herself into a

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CIVIL SERVICE ANNUITY FUNI).

Draft Memorial laid before the Meeting on the 1st of January, 1838.

To the Hon'ble the Court or Diarcrons.

Sheweth—That the despatch of your Hon'ble Court addressed to the Governor-General in Council, and dated 3d May last, has been laid before the subscribers to the Civil Service Annuity Fund, at their annual meeting, having been communicated by the Government to the Managers of the Fund for that especial purpose, and thus has been printed and circulated to the Service.

That in this despatch your Hon'ble Court has declared your approval and confirmation of the rules pass. ed by the Service to give effect to to the measures of indulgence towards the Service sanctioned by the orders

of your Hon'ble Court, dated 27th May, 1835; but your Hon'ble Court repeat the injunction that the rules so passed shall not be extended beyond three years without your further special sanction. Your memorialits, on the part of the whole body of the Civil Servants, subscribers to the fund, whom they represent, beg to offer to your Hon'ble Court their humble thanks for the consideration manifested for the interests and wishes of your Servants in these orders. Through the effect of the provision made for permitting the retirement of Servants on their completing one quarter only instead of one half of the value of the annuities, no less than fifty of your senior Civil Servants will be enabled to retire in independence, the majority of whom

must otherwise have spent the remainder of their days in India, some through loss of fortune, from disastrous commercial failures, others through disappointment and tardy promotion in their career of service, and many, it need not be concealed, through early improvidence and debts contracted under temptations that no longer exist.

Your Hon'ble Court has benefited directly from these retirements in the imme liate relief they have given to the finances of this presidency ; for a large proportion of the Servants who have so relinquished or are about to relinquish office, have been in the receipt of personal allowances and augmented salaries not continued to their successors; and, in many instances, a saving of the entire salary has been effected by abolition of the office on the vacancy occurring. Moreover, through the liberal provision thus afforded, your Hon'ble Court has been relieved from the claim which your Commercial Servants of this presidency, whose career had been confined to that department so as to unfit them for high offices in other lines of service, must indubitably have possessed of your liberality, consequent on the abrupt discontinuance of your trade in India. But the most important benefit of all has resulted, srom the means and the inducement affolded by this more liberal provision to meritorious Servants worn out by their unren,itted “xertions to relinquish important official situations, the duties of which they were from infirmity no longer able to perform.

The large number of retirements occasioned by these measures, has not, however, had the effect that might have been anticipated in accelerating the promotion of Junior Servants; owing to the number of situations abolished, or filled by persons from other professions. To the working branches of the Service, therefore, there has yet been little gain in present position, and if the rule for completing only a quarter of the value of the annuity on retirement, is to cease altogether at the end of the third year, there will be none in future prospect, from the measures of relief devised by your Hon'ble Court.

Your memorialists being thoroughly convinced that the rule in question may safely be continued with advantage to the '. and without imposing new burthens on the finances of your Hon'ble Court, and feeling strongly the inevitable consequences that will follow from its sudden ce-sation are emboldened again to urge upon your Hon'ble Court their humble request that the present order for the rule to cease after it shall have been applied to the annuities of 1838, may be re-considered.

Your memorialists would submit that the effect of fixing a date for the cessation of the rule, has already been felt injuriously : Junior Servants whose due period of service and residence has just been completed, have hurried forward their applications and have retired without the excuse of failing health, and before their accumulation of ineans was properly advanced upon a calculation that the annuity at a quarter value now is the same thing as one taken two years hence under the condition of completing the half value. Thus the extra inducement offered within the period fixed producing anticipated applications from Junior Servants, the whole number of annuities is likely to be prematurely taken, and several Seniors will be deprived of their just provision, when in ordinary course the period of their retirement shall arrive. The regular current of promotion, which, while all are confident of obtaining the retiring provision when their turn shall come, flows evenly with contentment to all, threatens to become unnecessarily deranged, and the advantage conceded instead of being a fairly earned and certain provision, will be the prize of hasty eagerness, and a source of contentious jealousy and envious feeling.

If your Hon'ble Court had graciously permitted the rule to stand until stopped by a vote of the Service, the annuities granted on improved terms, instead of being seized with greedy avidity so as to threaten a deficiency to meet the applications, which your memorialists at present see reason to apprehend, would have remained for distribution amongst your Servants in the order of their being ready for retirement, and the measure would have been much more extensively beneficial without injury or loss of any kind to your Hon'ble Court.

Your memorialists solicit attention to the following brief reference to the principle on which the Annuity Fund was established as affording incoutrovertible proof of the ability of the Fund to provide its annuities on the terms of quarter payment.

Your Hon'ble Court is aware that the prospective estimate, upon which the assurance of the stability of the Fund is founded, assumes an annual subscription from the Service of about three lakhs and a quarter (the real average has exceeded three lakhs and a half,) and a like sum being reckoned as donation from your Hon'ble Court, the sum of six lakhs and a half of sicca rupees was thus annually to be provided ; but in order to furnish nine annuities per annum, an income somewhat exceeding nine lakhs was necessary, the calculation was therefore so made, that through fines to the extent of half the value of the annuities, a capital in shape of unappropriated ba: lance should be provided in the early years of the institution, from the interest of which at six per cent., added to a permanent sum of about one lakh from fines, the remaining sum of two lakhs and a half of sicca rupees per anuum should be secured at the eud of the 20th year.

In the first ten years of the Fund the expenditure for the purchase of annuities, instead of being nine lakhs per annum, was less than half that sum owing to the paucity of retirements. Consequently the accumulation, instead of arising from fines, and proceeding in the ratio estimated, was a net saving out of the income from subscription and donation, and on the first May, 1836, it amounted to the enormous sum of Co. Rs. 74,02,874, or Sa. Rs. 69, 40, 195, exclusive entirely of the values set apart yearly as equivalent to the annuities furnished.

Your Hon'ble Court, upon representation of this condition of the Fund, and of the unfortunate circumstances which had combined to prevent the due retirement of your Bengal Servants, allowed annuities to be granted for three years on the terms of quarter payment. But with due foresight, and in order to secure the stability of the Fund, it was ordered, that before making this appropriation out of the inordinately large balance that had accumulated, one-third of the value of over-due annuities, together with any that might remain unclaimed at the end of the three years, should at once be added to the capital of the Fund, the interest of which was required to make good the annual income of future years.

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But nine lakhs of sicca rupees is the full average value of nine annuities, which might be purchased with the sum, without the Fund's demanding any further payment from retiring Servants. The rule for completing half the value was adopted, first in order to admit Senior Servants from the date of the Fund's being established, and that their payments might from the required capital, and secondly, for equalization of the benefit yielded by the Fund, and in order to provide a perpetual source of income, then deemed indispensable to secure annuities in sufficient number. If, however, the interest of the capital of the Fund yields a sufficiency of income to provide the full amount required, the fines may be dispensed with as a source of income, and a lower amount than one half may safely be assumed as the amount to be made good by the retiring Servants. The question therefore of the Fund's ability to continue fur

nishing even nine annuities on the quarter payment terms, resolves itself into a simple calculation, whether the refunds to the more fortunate Servants whose subscriptions exceed the quarter value,are likely to equal, fill short, or exceed the fines to be required from others to make good that proportion. The result of the experimental rule to the present date has shown an excess of fines above resunds amounting to 1,17,532 Co's. Rs.

the communication being limited to Bombay ; which

But your memorialists are not prepared to draw from this circumstance the conclusion, that the subscriptions of retiring members will ordinarily fall short of that Fo more especially when the Fund shall jave been of that duration, that servants will ordinarily have subscribers for the whole period of their service. Although otherefore your memorialists are convinced that the Fund may safely grant annuities to the extent of its fixed income on the terms of requiring no further payment in the way of fine from retiring Servants, and the necessity of making good, a quarter value may fitly and advantageously be applied as a limit only to the benefit any Servant may take from the Fund, the refund ol excess subscriptions above that proportion ought not

135,592-10-2 18,060-13-5

1,17,532 00

Fines, Refunds,

If indeed your Hon'ble Court derermine to restrict the number of annuities permanently to six per annum or two-thirds of the original number, the values of the remaining three may be applied to the refund of excess subscriptions; but if the whole income be applied to granting annuities, there will be no source from which to supply this outlay.

Your memorialists therefore beg submissively to solicit from your Hon'ble Court, not that the rule as passed by the Service may be allowed to stand, under which only six annuities can be granted annually on the terms of quarter payment with refund of excess of subscriptions, but that you will permit the Fund to grant annuities not exceeding nine in number to the extent of the annual fixed income of the Fund from subscriptions, your donation, and interest on the fixed capital, under the condition of requiring retiring Servants to make good to the extent of a quarter of the value of their annuities ; but receiving no refund of any excess in the amount of their subscriptsons, in case these should at the time of retirement with interest exceed the annules taken.

And your memoralists will ever pray,+Calcutta Courier, Jan. 3.

to stand as part of any permanent rule of the institution.

STEAM MEMORIA L, &c

The following draft of a memorial to the Board of Cantrol intended to be proposed at the public meeting on Thrusday morning next, is published for general information:

The Respectful Memorial, &c.

Sheweth,--That your memorialists, under date 5th March, one thousand, eight hundred and thirty-six, addressed a memorial to your Right Hon'ble Board, praying that certain resolutions of the Select Committee of the Commons, which sat in July, 1834, recommending the immediate establishment of a Steam Communication with India by the Red Sea, might be forthwith fully acted upon ; and that steps might be immediately taken in conjunction with the Hon'ble the Court of Directors of the East India Company, to establish a regular Steam Communication between the principal India Ports and the Read Sea.

That your memorialists very gratefully acknowledge the consideration and attention of your Tright Hon’ble Board, in having in a letter, dated the 17th October, 1836, through your Secretary, to the address of the Hon’ble Sir Edward Ryan, Chief Justice of Fort William in Bengal, who signed the memorial on their behalf, acknowledged the receipt of the memorial, and declared that the subject should receive that consideration to which its great importance and the high respectability of the parties subscribing it were fairly entitled.

That since the date of the above memorial, your memorialists understand from a statement made by the President of your Right Hon'ble Board to the Select Committee of the House of Commons appointed in June last, to enquite into the best means of establishing a communication by steam with India by way of the Read Sea, that the Hon'ble Court have concluded an arrangement with Her Majesty's Government for the establishment of a monthly steam communication be: tween Great Britain and India by way of the Red sea,

arrangement was considered by the President of your Right Hon'ble Board as in effect conforming to one of

the alternatives proposed in the 5th Resolution of the Select Committee of the House of Commons in 1834, which left to the joint consideration of the Home Go vernment and East India Company “whether the communication should be in the first instance from Bombay, from Calcutta, or according to the combined plan of the Bengal Steam Committee.”

That your memorialists, sensible of the advantages derivable from the establishment of a frequent expeditious and regular Steam Communicatan limited to Bombay, adopted as it has been by the President of your Rigol Hon'ble Board, “ in order to prevent delay in the coinmencement of so useful an enterprize, desire to express their gratitude to your Right Hon'ble Board for the e+ tablishment of such a communication; but your memo: rialists respectfully submit, that the advantages deno. ble from such limited communication, are in reality of little importance, when considered with reference to those which must result from extending it to the other presidencies: whether in regard to the iutrinsic advan: tages themselves, or to the respective costs at which each is attainable.

That your memorialists have the less hesitation in pressing upon the consideration of your Right Hoo ble Board the expediency of the immediate extension of the communication to the other presidencies in cosequence of perceiveing, from the statement rendered by the President of your Right Hon'ble Board to the Select Conmittee of the Hon’ble the House of Commons, that the Hon'ble the Court of Directors have reserved the question of such extension for consideration after trial his been fairly made of the limited communication, * have further recommended to the Right Hon'ble the Governor-General to send either the Atalanta or Boo nice round from Calcutta to Madras, thence to Ceylon and thence to Socotra and up the Read Sea, with a vie" to ascertain practically what objection there may be.” that route ; and because the select Committee o'.” House of Commons which was appointed in June to enquire into the best means of establishing a to munication by steam with India by way of the R* sea, to whom this purpose of establishing the communication to Bombay alone was known, recommended, ex: pressly with reference to such extension, a continued and zealous attention to the subject on the part of Her Majesty's Government and the East India Company which extension, moreover, appeared to the Committee perfectly compatible with the arrangements in progress towards the limited communication.

That your memorialists regard this reservation on the part of the Hon'ble, Court of the consideration of the ulterior extension of the communication to the three presidencies, and the recommendation to the Right Hon'ble the Governor-General, to cause an experimental voyage to be made from Calcutta, as a recognition, by the Hon'ble Court, of the superiority of the extended over the limited communication ; and the President of your Right Honorable Board having expressly declared his opinion in favor of such extended communication, your memorialists therefore deem it to be the less necessary to dwell on that superiority. They would, however, briefly state, that under the restriction to Bombay the advantages of the communication to the rest of India, beyond the more speedy conveyance of correspondence, and that limited as to size, are of little value, from calcutta, between which place and Europe by far the most extended intercourse obtains. Passengers can never be sure of reaching Bombay in time for the steamer; and your memorialists would respectfully observe, that it is chiefly from mutual personal intercourse that the benefits and advantages contemplated by the Hon'ble Court of Directors in their despatch to the Government of Bombay under date the 14th March, 1834, must spring.

That, as regards the intercommunication between the Home Authorities and the Presidencies on the eastern side of India, and especially the Supreme Government, the confinement of the communication to Bombay, must limit the correspondence to short letters consisting mere: ly of general heads of information on the one hand and instructions on the other ; while by the establishment of a monthly steam communication with the three presidencies, the minutest details of the several Governments, recorded in the proceedings of the Governments, as well as in those of the several boards, could be conveyed Home monthly as they occurred, within 60 days of their transmission from India; thus furnishing the ruling authorities at home with a regular connected series of fully detailed perfect information of , all proceedings throughout all India, in accordance with the grand desi. deratum as declared by Mr. Peacock, in his evidence before the select committee of the House of Commons; viz. In time of war expeditious communication is adviseable; in time of peace regularity is the thing and perfect knowledge when we have it; if we have a regular communication and imperfect knowledge occasional expedition will not make up for it."

That your memorialists refrain from enlarging further on the obvious incalculable mutual advantages which must arise to the two countries by approximation in the most ample form of which it is capable ; and rather address themselves to urging on your Right Hon'ble Board to concur with the Hon'ble the Court of Directors in the immediate establishment of the communication to the three presidencies on the most enlarged and, liberal scale; worthy at once of the two countries, and of the prospects of real good, which such a communication, so established, hold out not merely to India but to the whole of Eastern Asia.

That it appears to your memorialists that no experi mental voyage can be necessary to establish the practicability of the communication being carried on monthly from all the presidencies of India, due attention being

had in the South west monsoon in the Arabian Sea to such a course being taken as circumstances may render necessary ; that in fact there is no part of the world where steam navigation can be so regularly and seculely carried on as in India, where from the regularity with which the winds blow, a steamer can take a position to windward of her intended port without fear in the interunediate time of a change of wind.

That referring to the declared opinion of the Select Committee of the House of Commons to the effect that the more extended system of communication is perfectly compatible with the arrangement in progress for the limited communication to Bombay, your memorialists would observe that this compatibility could be much more easily and advantageously applied, if the arrangements for the whole measure were in progress simultaneously, than if those for the extension are left out of consideration in the arrangements for the limited communication ; because it may be found that arrangements sufficient for the latter may not be so for the former, whence it might be necessary, at some sacrifice to remodel the establishment prepared for the limited comInunication.

That your memorialists observe from the evidence of Mr. Peacock, before the Select Committee of the House of Commons, that the overland postage of the letters sent from all other parts of India to Bombay for steam conveyance is considered as an indemnity to the East India Company towards re-imbursement of one-half of the charge of conveyance of the mails between Alexandria aad Bombay.

That the individuals residing in Calcutta and its neighbourhood send and receive very nearly one-third of the whole number of letters that pass between England and India, notwithstanding which if it were impracticable to distribute letters from England by steam vessels by any other means than through Bombay, of course your memorialists could not complain of the necessary charge for the conveyance of their letters between Calcutta and that place; but when the British Legislature, with characteristic liberality in cases of transmission of correspondence, has limited the postage of a single letter to ls. from the Red Sea to a any port in the East “Indies",your memorialists do consider it to be unreasonable and unfair that they should be compelled to contribute to the means of transmission to Bombay only, by an additional payment of fifteen annas or ls 9}d. ; that the inhabitants of Madras and its neighbourhood are in like manner subject to this unreasonable impost in the reduced amount of the overland postage to that place. In fact your memorialists submit that by the restriction to Bombay the intended liberality of the legislature of Great Britain and the consequent advantage of the multiplication of correspondence is shut out from the inhabitants of Calcutta and Madras and from others residing within two or three days dawk distances, involving, your memorialists venture to assume, nearly if not quite the half in number of all the letters dispatched from India.

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