Travels Into Bokhara: Travels into Bokhara [continued] book I. General and geographical memoir on the part of Central Asia. book II. An historical sketch of the countries between India and the Caspian Sea. book III. On the commerce of Central Asia. Observations on Lieutenant Burnes's collection of Bactrian and other coins by H. H. Wilson and James Prinsep

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Page 416 - great Novogorod." The opening of a passage to India by the Cape of Good Hope, in the fifteenth century, effected an eventful change in the channels of ancient commerce ; but the fruits of that discovery continued for a long time in the hands of the Portuguese. In the middle of the following century, while that nation were reaping the advantages of this new line of trade, the English sent merchants and ambassadors to seek for other outlets of commerce, among the nations on the Caspian and eastward...
Page 389 - Arabians, the industry of the Greeks discovered a new channel, by which the productions of India might be conveyed to Constantinople. They were carried up the Indus, as far as that great river is navigable; thence they were transported by land to the banks of the river Oxus, and proceeded down its stream to the Caspian sea. There they entered the Volga, and sailing up it, were carried by land to the Tanais, which conducted them into the Euxine sea, where vessels from Constantinople waited their arrival.
Page 275 - any future cause call forth the combined ef" forts of the Sicques to maintain the existence " of empire and religion, we may see some " ambitious chief, led on by his genius and " success, absorbing the power of his associates, " display, from the ruins of their commonwealth,
Page 195 - The advantages of the Oxus both in a political and commercial point of view must then be regarded as very great: the many facilities which have been enumerated point it out either as the channel of merchandise or the route of a military expedition ; nor is it from the features of the river itself that we form such a conclusion. It is to be remembered that its banks are peopled and cultivated ; it must therefore be viewed as a navigable river, possessing great facilities for improving the extent of...
Page 242 - ... quadrupeds. They often attempt to walk across, and numbers of them are ensnared. The greatest silence is preserved in crossing Hindoo Koosh ; and no one speaks loud, or fires a gun, lest the reverberation cause a fall of snow. But the most singular phenomenon on Hindoo Koosh appears to be the snow-worm, which is described to resemble the silk-worm in its mature state. This insect is only found in the regions of perpetual congelation, and dies on being removed from the snow. I do not suppose that...
Page 325 - The justice of this chief affords a constant theme of praise to all classes: the peasant rejoices at the absence of tyranny; the citizen at the safety of his home and the strict municipal regulations regarding weights and measures ; the merchant at the equity of the decisions and the protection of his property, and the soldiers at the regular manner in which their arrears are discharged. A man in power can have no higher praise.
Page 325 - Kabul, in his zeal for orthodox government, has deprived his subjects of the luxury of wine and spirits as being prohibited by his creed. The enactment has driven the Jews and Armenians from his country, since they had no other means to procure a subsistence. A good Mahommedan ought not to regret the...
Page 154 - There is also a never-ceasing display of the most brilliant meteors, which dart like rockets in the sky : ten or twelve of these are sometimes seen in an hour, assuming almost every colour ; fiery red, blue, pale and faint.
Page 280 - Bedee, or Sahib Sing, might yet frustrate the designs of any ruler, and, by a crusade in behalf of this religion, overthrow the best laid designs of an ambitious prince. Runjeet Sing is aware of this influence, and, with but little religion, takes care to enlist the church in his cause, by constantly receiving two of its priests with distinction and confidence. Yet the Seiks are a most tolerant nation, and evince a merciful consideration in the differences of religion, that forms a bright contrast...
Page 463 - Taringini, to BC 388 ; because Kashmir became a Buddha country under Tartar princes, shortly after the death of Sakya; but from Mr. Csoma's subsequent examination of the Tibetan sacred books, in which the three periods of their compilation are expressly stated ; " first, under Sakya himself (520 — 638 B. c.), then under Ashoka, king of Pataliputra, 110 years after the decease of Sakya ; and lastly by Kaniska, upwards of 400 years after Sakya," — little doubt can remain that the epoch, as it stands...

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