The London Magazine, Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer, Volume 31

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R. Baldwin, 1762 - English essays
 

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Page 16 - ... continued the Corporal, I thought it was proper to tell him I was Captain Shandy's servant, and that your honour (though a stranger) was extremely concerned for his father ; and that if there was any thing in your house or cellar, — (And thou mightst have added my purse too, said my uncle Toby), — he was heartily welcome to it.
Page 14 - IT was some time in the summer of that year in which Dendermond was taken by the Allies, which was about seven years before my father came into the country, — and about as many after the time that my uncle Toby and Trim had privately decamped from my father's house in town, in order to lay some of the finest sieges to some of the finest fortified cities in Europe; — when my uncle Toby was one evening...
Page 18 - ... in the night, what was his complaint, where was his pain, and what he could do to help him ; and without giving him time to...
Page 16 - I thought, said the curate, that you gentlemen of the army, Mr. Trim, never said your prayers at all. I heard the poor gentleman say his prayers last night, said the landlady, very devoutly, and with my own ears, or I could not have believed it. Are you sure of it? replied the curate. A soldier, an...
Page 16 - I am sure, said I, his honour will not like the toast the worse for being toasted by an old soldier. The youth took hold of my hand, and instantly burst into tears. Poor youth ! said my uncle Toby ; he has been bred up from an infant in the army, and the name of a soldier, Trim, sounded in his ears like the name of a friend : I wish I had him here. I never in the longest march, said the Corporal, had so great a mind to my dinner, as I had to cry with him for company. What could be the matter with...
Page 17 - In the second place, for which, indeed, thou hast the same excuse, continued my uncle Toby — when thou offeredst him whatever was in my house, thou shouldst have offered him my house too. A sick brother officer should have the best quarters, Trim ; and if we had him with us, we could tend and look to him. Thou art an excellent nurse thyself, Trim ; and what with thy care of him, and the old woman's, and his boy's, and mine together, we might recruit him again at once, and set him upon his legs....
Page 444 - Lo, children and the fruit of the womb are an heritage and gift that cometh of the Lord. Like as the arrows in the hand of the giant, even so are the young children. Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them ; they shall not be ashamed when they speak with their enemies in the gate.
Page 15 - ... twill be. enough to give your honour your death, and . bring on your honour's torment in your groin.
Page 479 - I can discover no political evil in suffering bullies, sharpers, and rakes to rid the world of each other by a method of their own, where the law hath not been able to find an expedient.
Page 16 - ... said my uncle Toby) he was heartily welcome to it: He made a very low bow (which was meant to your honour) but no answer, — for his heart was full — so he went up stairs with the toast; — I warrant you, my dear...

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