MEXICO, AND THE UNITED STATES; THEIR MUTUAL RELATIONS AND COMMON INTERESTS.

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Page 341 - ... erect or maintain any fortifications commanding the same or in the vicinity thereof, or occupy, or fortify, or colonize, or assume, or exercise any dominion over Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito coast,- or any part of Central America...
Page 311 - It completely reverses all the political relations of the United States, and will form a new epoch in our political course.
Page 341 - America; nor will either make use of any protection which either affords or may afford, or any alliance which either has or may have, to or with any State or People for the purpose of erecting or maintaining any such fortifications, or of occupying, fortifying, or colonizing Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito Coast or any part of Central America, or of assuming or exercising dominion over the same...
Page 341 - Britain take advantage of any intimacy, or use any alliance, connection, or influence that either may possess with any state or government through whose territory the said canal may pass, for the purpose of acquiring or holding, directly or indirectly, for the citizens or subjects of the one, any rights or advantages in regard to commerce or navigation through the said canal which shall not be offered on the same terms to the citizens or subjects of the other.
Page 312 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy.
Page 342 - And the contracting parties likewise agree, that each shall enter into treaty stipulations with such of the Central American States, as they may deem advisable, for the purpose...
Page 342 - The Governments of the United States and Great Britain having not only desired, in entering into this convention, to accomplish a particular object, but also to establish a general principle, they hereby agree to extend their protection, by treaty stipulations, to any other practicable communications, whether by canal or railway, across the isthmus...
Page 340 - Convention their views and intentions with reference to any means of communication by Ship Canal, which may be constructed between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, by the way of the River San Juan de Nicaragua and either or both of the Lakes of Nicaragua or Managua, to any port or place on the Pacific Ocean, — The President of the United States, has conferred full powers on John M.
Page 315 - In Europe, nothing but Europe is seen, or supposed to have any right in the affairs of nations ; but this little event, of France's possessing herself of Louisiana. which is thrown in as nothing, as a mere make-weight in the general settlement of accounts, — this speck which now appears as an almost invisible point in the horizon, is the embryo of a tornado which will burst on the countries on both sides of the Atlantic, and involve in its effects their highest destinies.
Page 291 - States in all that concerns their internal government, but united in a Federation established according to the principles of this fundamental law.

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