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COMMENCEMENT OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
IN MDCCLXXXIX

TO THE

RESTORATION OF THE BOURBONS
IK MDCCCXV

SIR ARCHIBALD ALISON, BAET.

F.R.S.K

NINTH EDITION

VOL. VII.

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS
EDINBURGH AND LONDON
MDCCCLIV

CONTENTS OF YOL. VII.

Chapter XLVI.—Campaign Of Friedland, And Peace Of Tilsit.

Treaties between the Allies for the prosecution of the war, 1.—Austria strives

to mediate, ib.—Negotiations of Napoleon; auxiliary forces obtained from

Spain, 3.—Operations in Pomerania, 4.—Armistice between the Swedes

and French, 5.—Army of reserve on the Elbe, 6.—Negotiations with Turkey

and Persia, ib.—Jealousy excited in the Divan by thesummoning of Parga,

7.—Measures to organise the military strength of Poland, 8.—Winter quar-

ters, ib.—Combat of Guttstadt, 9.—Designs of Napoleon for the interior of

his empire, 10.—Finances of France, 12.—Statutes of the Grand Sanhedrim

of the Jews, 14.—Napoleon's efforts to feed his troops; sieges in Silesia,

ib.—Siege of Dantzic, 16.—Progress of the siege, 18.—Reinforcements to

the Russian army, 20.—The French army, 21.—Designs of the Russians on

Ney's corps, 23.—Napoleon concentrates, and the Russians fall back, 24.—

Battle of Heilsberg, 27.—Fresh attack by Lannes, which also proves unsuc-

cessful, 28.—Violent explosion of Lannes, Murat, and Napoleon in conse-

quence, ib., note.—Frightful appearance of the slain after the battle, 29.—

Napoleon turns their flank, and compels them to evacuate Heilsberg, ib.

Movements before the battle of Friedland, ib.—Battle of Friedland, 34.—

Capture of Konigsberg, 38.—Retreat of the Russians to the Niemen, 39.—

Conclusion of an armistice, 41.—Interview on the raft at Tilsit, 42.—The

negotiations at Tilsit, 43.—Napoleon's interview with the Queen of Prussia,

ib.—Treaty of Tilsit ; creation of the grand-duchy of Warsaw, and kingdom

of Westphalia, 45.—Treaty with Prussia, 46.—Secret treaty for the partition

of Turkey, 48.—Secret articles, ib.—Measures of Napoleon to secure his an-

ticipated Turkish acquisitions, 50.—Convention regarding the payment of

the French contribution on Prussia, 51.—Losses sustained by the French,

52.—Retribution that was approaching to France, 53.—Consequences of the

treaty of Tilsit in the end to Napoleon, 54.—Perfidy of Napoleon towards

the Turks, 55.—Projects of the Emperors for the spoliation of the other

European powers, 56.

Chapteb XLVIL—General Sketch Of The British Empire In India.

Comparison of the Roman empire and British India, 58.—Physical description

of the Indian Peninsula, 61.—Diplomatic ability with which India has been

governed, 63.—Advantages of the British government to the Indian people,

ib.—Police force established throughout Bengal, 66.—Indian taxation, ib.

—The Zemindar system, ib.—The Ryotwar system, 67.—The Village sys-

tem, 68.—System of toleration in India, 70.—Variety of national character,

71.—The sepoy force, 73.—Contrast of the Company's rule to the Mahom-

medan sway, 77.—Wonderful nature of this empire, 78.

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